Document




















winnebagoindlogora09.jpg



2018
Notice of Annual Meeting of Shareholders


December 11, 2018
4:00 p.m. Central Time



















 




 
 
 
 
 



UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

 
 
SCHEDULE 14A
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Proxy Statement Pursuant to Section 14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

Filed by the Registrant x
Filed by party other than the Registrant o
Check the appropriate box:
o    Preliminary Proxy Statement
o    Confidential, For Use of the Commission Only (as permitted by Rule 14a-6(e)(2))
x    Definitive Proxy Statement    
o    Definitive Additional Materials
o    Soliciting Material Pursuant to Section 240.14a-12

winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

 
WINNEBAGO INDUSTRIES, INC.
 
 
(Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)
 
 
 
 
 
(Name of Person(s) Filing Proxy Statement, if Other than the Registrant)
 


Payment of Filing Fee (Check the appropriate box):        
x    No fee required.    
o    Fee computed on table below per Exchange Act Rules 14a-6(i)(1) and 0-11.    
1)
Title of each class of securities to which transaction applies:
2)
Aggregate number of securities to which transaction applies:
3)
Per unit price or other underlying value of transaction computed pursuant to Exchange Act Rule 0-11 (set forth the amount on which the filing fee is calculated and state how it was determined):
4)
Proposed maximum aggregate value of transaction:
5)
Total fee paid:
o    Fee paid previously with preliminary materials.    
o    Check box if any part of the fee is offset as provided by Exchange Act Rule 0-11(a)(2) and identify the filing for which the
offsetting fee was paid previously. Identify the previous filing by registration statement number, or the Form or Schedule and
the date of its filing.    
1)
Amount previously paid:    
2)
Form, Schedule or Registration Statement No.:    
3)
Filing party:    
4)
Date filed:






 
 
 
 
 



winnebagoindlogora09.jpg


Notice of Annual Meeting
of Shareholders
to be held December 11, 2018


Dear Fellow Shareholders,

Winnebago Industries, Inc. will hold its 2018 Annual Meeting of Shareholders on December 11, 2018, at 4:00 p.m. Central Standard Time. The Annual Meeting will be completely virtual. You may attend the meeting, submit questions, and vote your shares electronically during the meeting via live webcast by visiting www.virtualshareholdermeeting.com/WGO2018 and entering the 16-digit control number included with the Notice of Internet Availability or proxy card. Instructions on how to attend and participate in the Annual Meeting via the webcast are posted on this site as well.

The proxy materials were either made available to you over the Internet or mailed to you on or about October 31, 2018. At the meeting, shareholders will be asked to:

 
 
 
BOARD RECOMMENDATIONS
 
 
1
Elect three Class I directors to hold office for a three-year term;
FOR
 
 
 
2
Approve, on an advisory basis, the compensation of our Named Executive Officers;
FOR
 
 
 
3
Approve the 2019 Omnibus Incentive Plan;
FOR
 
 
 
4
Ratify the selection of Deloitte & Touche LLP as our independent registered public accountant for fiscal 2019; and
FOR
 
 
 
 
Act on any other matters that may properly come before the meeting.
 
 
 

Only shareholders of record at the close of business on October 16, 2018 may vote at the Annual Meeting or any adjournment thereof.
 
 
By Order of the Board of Directors
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
/s/ Stacy L. Bogart
 
 
 
Stacy L. Bogart
 
 
 
Vice President - General Counsel
 
Eden Prairie, MN
 
and Secretary
 
October 31, 2018
 
 
 
Your Vote Is Important
Whether or not you expect to attend the meeting, please vote via the Internet or telephone or request a paper proxy card to complete, sign and return by mail so that your shares may be voted. A prompt response is helpful and your cooperation is appreciated.


 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg



Table of Contents
Page
 
 


 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

Winnebago Industries, Inc.
605 West Crystal Lake Road - Forest City, Iowa 50436


Forward-looking Information
Statements in this Proxy Statement not based on historical facts are considered “forward-looking” and, accordingly, involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those discussed. Although such forward-looking statements have been made in good faith and are based on reasonable assumptions, there is no assurance that the expected results will be achieved. These statements include (without limitation) statements as to future expectations, beliefs, plans, strategies, objectives, events, conditions and financial performance.
These statements are intended to constitute “forward-looking” statements in connection with the “safe harbor” provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Winnebago Industries, Inc., an Iowa corporation (the “Company,” “Winnebago Industries,” “we,” “us” and “our”), is providing this cautionary statement to disclose that there are important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those anticipated. Reference is made to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended August 25, 2018 (the “2018 Form 10-K”) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) for a list of such factors.


Proxy Statement
This Proxy Statement is furnished in connection with the solicitation by our Board of Directors of proxies to be used at the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held virtually on December 11, 2018, at 4:00 p.m., Central Standard Time, and at any and all adjournments thereof (the “Annual Meeting” or the “Meeting”).
In accordance with rules and regulations adopted by the SEC, instead of mailing a printed copy of our proxy materials to each shareholder of record, we are now furnishing proxy materials to our shareholders on the Internet. If you received a Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials by mail, you will not receive a printed copy of the proxy materials, unless you specifically request a printed copy. Instead, the Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials will instruct you as to how you may access and review all of the important information contained in the proxy materials.
The Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials also instructs you as to how you may submit your proxy on the Internet. If you received a Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials by mail and would like to receive a printed copy of our proxy materials, you should follow the instructions for requesting such materials included in the Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials.
 
It is anticipated that the Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials will be mailed to shareholders on or about October 31, 2018.
Only holders of record of our common stock, par value $0.50 per share ("Common Stock"), at the close of business on October 16, 2018 (the "Record Date") will be entitled to receive notice of and to vote at the Annual Meeting. On the Record Date, we had outstanding 31,887,265 shares of Common Stock that were eligible to vote. Each share of Common Stock entitles the holder to one vote on each matter to be voted upon at the meeting. A majority of the outstanding shares of Common Stock represented in person or by proxy will constitute a quorum for the Annual Meeting.
If you submit a proxy or attend the Meeting, your Common Stock will be counted for the purpose of determining whether there is a quorum.
If you submit your proxy without voting instructions, your shares will be voted in favor of each director and each other item considered for shareholder approval. If you hold shares through a broker, follow the voting instructions provided by your broker. Shares held in your name as the shareholder of record may be voted electronically during the Annual Meeting.
The table below summarizes the vote required to approve each proposal, the vote required for each proposal and other important information regarding voting on each proposal:
 
Vote Required
Voting Options(1)
Board Recommend-ation(2)
Broker Discretionary Voting Allowed(3)
Item 1: Elect three Class I directors to hold office for a three-year term
Plurality of the votes cast(4)
FOR
WITHHOLD
FOR
No
Item 2: Advisory approval of executive compensation (the "Say on Pay" vote)
Majority of the votes cast(5)
FOR
AGAINST
ABSTAIN
FOR
No
Item 3: Approve the 2019 Omnibus Incentive Plan
Majority of the votes cast
FOR
AGAINST
ABSTAIN
FOR
No
Item 4: Ratify the appointment of Deloitte & Touche LLP as our independent registered public accountant for the fiscal year ending August 31, 2019
Majority of the votes cast
FOR
AGAINST
ABSTAIN
FOR
Yes

(1) A withhold vote or abstention will have no impact on the outcome of the voting on any of the proposals.
(2) If you submit a proxy without giving specific voting instructions, your shares will be voted in accordance with the Board's recommendations set forth above.
(3) If broker discretionary voting is not allowed, your broker will not be able to vote your shares on these matters unless your broker receives voting instructions from you. A broker non-vote will have no effect on the outcome of the voting on any of the proposals.
(4) The Board of Directors has adopted a majority voting policy for the election of directors in uncontested elections. Under this policy, in any uncontested election of directors of the Company, if any nominee receives less than a majority of the

1

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

votes cast for the nominee, that nominee shall still be elected, but must tender their resignation to the full Board of Directors for consideration at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board of Directors. The Board of Directors shall only not accept the tendered resignation for, in their judgment, a compelling reason.
(5) The vote of shareholders on this proposal is not binding on the Company, but rather is advisory in nature; however, the Board of Directors intends to carefully consider the result of the vote on this proposal.
Before the Meeting, you can appoint a proxy to vote your shares of Common Stock by following the instructions as set forth in the Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials. If, by request, you have received a printed copy of our proxy materials, you can appoint a proxy to vote your shares of Common Stock (i) by using the Internet (www.proxyvote.com), (ii) by calling the toll-free telephone number (1-800-690-6903) or (iii) you may indicate your vote by completing, signing and dating the proxy card where indicated and returning the card to Vote Processing, c/o Broadridge, 51 Mercedes Way, Edgewood, NY 11717 by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Standard Time on December 10, 2018.
If a proxy card is executed and returned, it may nevertheless be revoked at any time in accordance with the following instructions. A person may revoke a proxy electronically by
 
entering a new vote via the Internet or by telephone or a proxy may be revoked by (i) giving written notice to the Secretary of the Company (the “Secretary”), (ii) subsequently granting a later-dated proxy, (iii) attending the Meeting and voting virtually or (iv) executing a proxy designating another person to represent you at the Meeting and voting by your representative at the Meeting. Unless revoked, the shares represented by validly executed proxies will be voted at the Meeting in accordance with the instructions indicated thereon. To revoke a proxy by telephone or the Internet, you must do so by 12:00 p.m. Central Standard Time on December 10, 2018 (following the directions on the instructions as set forth in the Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials or in the printed proxy materials received by request). Attendance at the Annual Meeting will not cause your previously granted proxy to be revoked unless you specifically so request. If the Meeting is adjourned for any reason, the proxies can vote your Common Stock on the new Meeting date as well, unless you have revoked your proxy instructions.




Voting Securities and Principal Holders Thereof
The following table contains information with respect to the ownership of Common Stock by each person known to us who is the beneficial owner of more than 5% of the outstanding Common Stock. This information is based on ownership reported as of October 16, 2018 according to SEC filings of the beneficial owners listed below unless more recent information was appropriate to be used.
Name and Address of Beneficial Owner
Amount and Nature of Beneficial Ownership
 
% of
Common
Stock(1)
BlackRock, Inc.
55 East 52nd Street
New York, NY 10055
3,849,851 shares of Common Stock
(2) 
12.07%
Dimensional Fund Advisors LP
Building One
6300 Bee Cave Road
Austin, TX 78746
1,836,098 shares of Common Stock
(3) 
5.76%
(1)
Based on 31,887,265 outstanding shares of Common Stock on October 16, 2018.
(2)
Based on information provided in a Schedule 13G/A filed with the SEC on January 23, 2018 by BlackRock, Inc., a parent holding company ("Blackrock"). BlackRock reported that it has sole power to vote or direct the vote of 3,785,583 shares and sole power to dispose of or direct the disposition of 3,849,851 shares.
(3)
Based on information provided in a Schedule 13G/A filed with the SEC on February 9, 2018 by Dimensional Fund Advisors LP, an investment adviser ("DFA"). DFA reported that it has sole power to vote or direct the vote of 1,740,810 shares and sole power to dispose of or direct the disposition of 1,836,098 shares.


2

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg


The following table sets forth certain information known to us with respect to beneficial ownership of our Common Stock, as defined in Rule 13d-3 under the Exchange Act, at October 16, 2018 for (i) each of our directors and director nominees, (ii) each named executive officer of the Company in the summary compensation table below, (iii) all current executive officers (both NEO and non-NEO) and directors as a group. Except as otherwise indicated, the named beneficial owner has sole voting and investment power with respect to the shares held by such beneficial owner.
Name
Shares of
Common
Stock Owned Outright
Exercisable
Stock
Options(1)
Winnebago
Stock
Units(2)
Total Shares
of Common
Stock Owned
Beneficially
% of
Common
Stock(3)
Maria F. Blase




(4) 
Christopher J. Braun
9,740



9,740

(4) 
Stacy L. Bogart
10,000



10,000

(4) 
Robert M. Chiusano
24,700


24,880

49,580

(4) 
Donald J. Clark
764,426



764,426

2.39
William C. Fisher
16,740


7,134

23,874

(4) 
Michael J. Happe
40,802

36,203


77,005

(4) 
Brian D. Hazelton
12,999

7,412


20,411

(4) 
Bryan L. Hughes
12,787

3,718


16,505

(4) 
David W. Miles
6,740



6,740

(4) 
Richard D. Moss
5,140



5,140

(4) 
John M. Murabito
3,840



3,840

(4) 
Martha T. Rodamaker
16,240


12,051

28,291

(4) 
Directors and executive officers as a group (18 persons)
1,035,915

66,154

44,065

1,146,134

3.57(5)
(1)
Includes shares underlying stock options that are currently exercisable or become exercisable within 60 days.
(2)
Winnebago Stock Units held under our Directors' Deferred Compensation Plan as of October 16, 2018 (see further discussion of the plan in the Director Compensation section). These units are vested and will be settled 100% in Common Stock upon the earliest of the following events: director's termination of service, death or disability or a "change in control" of the Company, as defined in the plan.
(3)
Based on 31,887,265 outstanding shares of Common Stock on October 16, 2018.
(4)
Less than 1%.
(5)
Includes 66,154 shares that directors and executive officers as a group have the right to acquire within 60 days of October 16, 2018 through the exercise of stock options, and shares representing the 44,065 Winnebago stock units held by directors under our Directors' Deferred Compensation Plan as of October 16, 2018.


Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance
Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act requires our officers and directors and persons who own more than 10% of our Common Stock (collectively, “Reporting Persons”) to file reports of ownership and changes in ownership with the SEC. Reporting Persons are required by the SEC regulations to furnish us with copies of all Section 16(a) forms they file. Based solely on our review of the copies of such forms received or written representations from certain Reporting Persons that no Forms 5 were required for those persons, we believe that, during Fiscal 2018, all Reporting Persons complied with all applicable filing requirements, except that due to an administrative transition, delinquent Form 4 filings were filed as described herein: (i) for a grant of restricted stock on October 18, 2017, a Form 4 was filed on November 22, 2017 for each of Robert Chiusano, Christopher Braun, William
 
Fisher, David Miles, Richard Moss, John Murabito and Martha Rodamaker, (ii) for a grant of stock units on November 30, 2017, a Form 4 was filed on December 8, 2017 for each of Robert Chiusano, William Fisher and Martha Rodamaker, (iii) for a grant of restricted stock on October 18, 2017, a Form 4 was filed on October 23, 2017 for each of Michael Happe, Ashis Bhattacharya, Scott Degnan, Brian Hazelton, Bryan Hughes, Jeff Kubacki, Chris West and Bret Woodson, (iv) for withholding shares to cover taxes upon vesting on October 11, 2017, a Form 4 was filed on October 16, 2017 for each of Michael Happe, Ashis Bhattacharya and Brian Hazelton, (v) for a grant of stock options, settlement of performance awards, a grant of restricted stock and withholding shares to cover taxes upon vesting on October 18, 2017, a Form 4 was filed on October 23, 2017 for each of Scott Folkers and Scott Degnan, (vi) for withholding shares to cover taxes upon vesting on October 16, 2017, a Form 4 was filed on October 19, 2017 for each of Scott Folkers and Scott Degnan, and (vii) for withholding shares to cover taxes upon vesting on October 11, 2017 and October 13, 2017, a Form 4 was filed on October 16, 2017 for each of Scott Folkers, Scott Degnan and Bret Woodson.


3

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg



Corporate Governance
Board Leadership Structure

Our By-Laws and Corporate Governance Policy delegate to the Board of Directors the right to exercise its discretion to either separate or combine the offices of Board Chair and Chief Executive Officer ("CEO"). This decision is based upon the Board's determination of what is in the best interests of Winnebago Industries and our shareholders, in light of then-current and anticipated future circumstances and taking into consideration succession planning, skills and experience of the individual(s) filling those positions, and other relevant factors.
 
The Board, as part of its continuing obligation to determine the appropriate role for the Chair, has concluded that at this time the Company should have an independent Chair. The Board concluded that this structure provides us with a strong governance and leadership structure that is designed to exercise independent oversight of members of our management team ("Management") and key issues related to strategy and risk. Since June 14, 2016, Mr. Chiusano, an independent director, has served as Chair.
 
 
In addition, only independent directors serve on the Audit Committee, the Human Resources Committee and the Nominating and Governance Committee of the Board. Non-employee directors regularly hold executive sessions of the Board outside the presence of the CEO or any other employee under the Corporate Governance Policy that requires the Board's independent directors to hold executive sessions at least once each year; such executive sessions are led by the Chair.

The Board recognizes that, depending on the specific characteristics and circumstances of the Company, other leadership structures might also be appropriate. The Company is committed to reviewing this determination on an annual basis.

According to the Company's Corporate Governance Policy, whenever the Chair of the Board is also the CEO or an employee of the Company, the non-employee directors shall select an independent director to preside or lead at each executive session (the “Lead Director”). The Company's Corporate Governance Policy sets forth the authority, duties and responsibilities of any Lead Director.

 
Required Committees of the Board
The Board has established standing Audit, Human Resources, Nominating and Governance and Finance Committees to assist it in the discharge of its responsibilities. Each of such committees is governed by a written charter. A description of each committee, including its membership, principal responsibilities, and meeting frequency, is set forth below.

 
Committees of the Board
 
Audit
Human Resources
Nominating and Governance
Finance
Maria F. Blase(1)(2)
X
 
X
 
Christopher J. Braun (1)
 
X
X
 
Robert M. Chiusano (Chair) (1)
 
X
 
X
William C. Fisher (1)
X
 
Chair
 
David W. Miles (1)(2)
X
 
 
Chair
Richard D. Moss (1)(2)
Chair
 
 
X
John M. Murabito (1)
 
Chair
X
 
Martha T. Rodamaker (1)
X
 
 
X
Number of meetings in Fiscal 2018
7
5
5
5
Conducted a self-assessment of its performance
X
X
X
X
(1)
Determined to be "independent" under applicable listing standards of the NYSE.
(2)
Designated as an "audit committee financial expert" for purposes of Item 407, Regulation S-K under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.




4

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

 
 
 
 
Audit Committee

Each year, the committee appoints the independent registered public accountant to examine our financial statements. It reviews with representatives of the independent registered public accountant the auditing arrangements and scope of the independent registered public accountant's examination of the books, results of those audits, any non-audit services, their fees for all such services and any problems identified by and recommendations of the independent registered public accountant regarding internal controls. Others in regular attendance for part of the Audit Committee meeting typically include: the Board Chair; the CEO; the CFO; the Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary; and the Corporate Controller.

The Audit Committee meets at least annually with the CFO, the internal auditors and the independent auditors in separate executive sessions. The Audit Committee is also prepared to meet privately at any time at the request of the independent registered public accountant or members of our Management to review any special situation arising on any of the above subjects. The Audit Committee also performs other duties as set forth in its written charter which is available for review on the Corporate Governance portion of the Investor Relations section of our Web Site at http://www.winnebagoind.com. The Audit Committee annually reviews its written charter and recommends to the Board such changes as it deems necessary.
 
 
 
Members
 
Richard D. Moss, Chair
 
Maria F. Blase
 
William C. Fisher
 
David W. Miles
 
Martha T. Rodamaker
 



 
 
 
 
Nominating and Governance Committee

The Nominating and Governance Committee's charter, which is available for review on the Corporate Governance portion of the Investor Relations section of our Web Site at http://www.winnebagoind.com, establishes the scope of the committee's duties to include: (1) adopting policies and procedures for identifying and evaluating director nominees, including nominees recommended by shareholders; (2) identifying and evaluating individuals qualified to become Board members, considering director candidates recommended by shareholders and recommending that the Board select the director nominees for the next annual meeting of shareholders; (3) establishing a process by which shareholders and other interested parties are able to communicate with members of the Board; (4) developing and recommending to the Board a Corporate Governance Policy applicable to the Company; and (5) reviewing and approving Related Person Transactions (as defined below).

The committee recommended to the Board the director-nominees proposed in this Proxy Statement for election by the shareholders. The Nominating and Governance Committee reviews the qualifications of, and recommends to the Board, candidates to fill Board vacancies as they may occur during the year. The Nominating and Governance Committee will consider suggestions from all sources, including shareholders, regarding possible candidates for director. See also "Fiscal Year 2019 Shareholder Proposals" for a summary of the procedures that shareholders should follow to nominate a director.
 
 
 
Members
 
William C. Fisher, Chair
 
Maria F. Blase
 
Christopher J. Braun
 
John M. Murabito
 


 



 
 
 
 
Finance Committee


The Finance Committee's charter, which is available for review on the Corporate Governance portion of the Investor Relations section of our Web Site at http://www.winnebagoind.com, establishes the scope of the committee's duties to include: recommending to the Board financial policies, goals, and budgets that support the financial health, strategic goals, mission, and values of the Company, including the long-range financial plan of the Company, and annual capital budgets; evaluating major capital expenditures and financial transactions.

The Finance Committee has oversight in the following specific areas: strategic transactions, capitalization and debt and equity offerings, capital expenditure plans, financial review of business plans, rating agencies and investor relations, dividends, share repurchase authorizations, investment policy, debt management, tax strategies, and financial risk management.

 
 
 
Members
 
David W. Miles, Chair
 
Robert M. Chiusano
 
Richard D. Moss
 
Martha T. Rodamaker
 


 



5

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

 
 
 
 
Human Resources Committee

The Human Resources Committee's charter, which is available for review on the Corporate Governance portion of the Investor Relations section of our Web Site at http://www.winnebagoind.com, establishes the scope of the committee's duties to include: (1) reviewing and approving corporate goals and objectives relevant to compensation of our CEO, evaluating performance and compensation of our CEO in light of such goals and objectives and establishing compensation levels for other executive officers; (2) overseeing the evaluation of our executive officers (other than the CEO) and approving the general compensation program and salary structure of such executive officers; (3) administering and approving awards under our incentive compensation and equity-based plan; (4) reviewing and approving all executive officer compensation, including any executive employment agreements, severance agreements, and change in control agreements; (5) from time to time, reviewing the list of peer group companies used for compensation purposes; (6) reviewing and approving Board retainer fees, attendance fees, and other compensation, if any, to be paid to non-employee directors; (7) reviewing and discussing with Management the Compensation Discussion and Analysis section and certain other disclosures, including those relating to compensation advisors, compensation risk and the "say on pay" vote, as applicable for our Form 10-K and proxy statement; and (8) preparing the committee's annual report on executive compensation for our Form 10-K and proxy statement.

Role of Executive Officers — In Fiscal 2018, the Human Resources Committee delegated authority to designated members of Management to approve employment compensation packages for certain employees, not including the Named Executive Officers (NEOs) (as defined below), under certain circumstances. During Fiscal 2018, Mr. Happe as CEO, recommended to the committee proposals for base salary, target short-term incentive levels, actual short-term incentive payouts and long-term incentive grants for select NEOs for Fiscal 2019. The committee separately considers, discusses, modifies as appropriate, and takes action on such proposals and determines the compensation of the CEO and other NEOs. See “Compensation Discussion and Analysis-Role of Executive Officers in Compensation Decisions” below for further detail.

Role of Compensation Consultants — The Human Resources Committee has periodically utilized an outside compensation consultant for matters relating to executive compensation. In Fiscal 2018, the committee retained Willis Towers Watson through March 2018 and Semler Brossy Consulting Group LLC ("Semler Brossy") beginning in April 2018, to advise on certain executive compensation-related matters, as described further in the "Compensation Discussion and Analysis" Section.
 
 
 
Members
 
John Murabito, Chair
 
Christopher J. Braun
 
Robert M. Chiusano
 



 


 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Our Board of Directors held six meetings during Fiscal 2018. Actions taken by any committee of the Board are reported generally to the Board of Directors at its next meeting. During Fiscal 2018, all of the directors attended more than 75% of the aggregate of Board of Directors' meetings and meetings of committees of the Board on which they served. Our Corporate Governance Policy, discussed below, encourages, but does not require, Board members to attend annual meetings of shareholders. At the last annual meeting of shareholders, all of the then-current directors were in attendance.

Executive Sessions of Non-Employee Directors Independent directors meet privately in executive sessions to consider such matters as they deem appropriate, without Management being present, as a routinely scheduled agenda item for every Board meeting and at least once a year. pursuant to the requirements of the NYSE. During Fiscal 2018, all non-employee directors were independent.

Procedures With Respect to Nominations of Directors

The Nominating and Governance Committee will consider as a candidate any director who has indicated to the Nominating and Governance Committee that he or she is willing to stand for re-election, and who has not reached the age of 72 years prior to the date of re-election to the Board, as well as any other person who is appropriately recommended by any shareholder. The Nominating and Governance Committee may also undertake its own search process for candidates and may retain the services of professional search firms or other third parties to assist in identifying and evaluating potential nominees.

In considering a potential nominee for the Board, candidates also will be assessed in the context of the then-current composition of the Board, the operating requirements of the
 
Company and the long-term interests of all shareholders. In conducting this assessment, the Nominating and Governance Committee will consider diversity (including, but not limited to, age, experience and skills) and such other factors as it deems appropriate given the then-current and anticipated future needs of the Board and the Company in order to maintain a balance of perspectives, qualifications, qualities and skills on the Board. Although the Nominating and Governance Committee may seek candidates that have different qualities and experiences at different times in order to maximize the aggregate experience, qualities and strengths of the Board members, nominees for each election or appointment of directors will be evaluated using a substantially similar process, without regard to race, religion, gender, national origin or other protected category, and under no circumstances will the Nominating and Governance Committee evaluate nominees recommended by a shareholder of the Company pursuant to a process substantially different than that used for other nominees for the same election or appointment of directors.

6

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

The Nominating and Governance Committee may also consider such other factors as it may deem are in the best interests of the Company and its shareholders. The Nominating and Governance Committee does, however, believe it appropriate for at least one member of the Board and Audit Committee to meet the criteria as an "audit committee financial expert" as defined by SEC rules.

During a special Board meeting on September 24, 2018, Maria F. Blase was appointed as a Class I member of the Board of Directors, with her initial term expiring at the 2018 Annual Meeting. The Nominating and Governance Committee led the process for selecting the director nominee and recommending the selected nominee to the Board. A third-party search firm, James Drury Partners Ltd., assisted the Nominating and Governance Committee with its recruitment efforts and identified Ms. Blase as a candidate. The search firm recommended candidates that satisfied the Board’s criteria. The search firm also provided research and pertinent information regarding candidates, as the Committee requested.

Policy and Procedures With Respect to Related Person Transactions

The Board of Directors adopted the Winnebago Industries, Inc. Related Person Transaction Policy and Procedures, which provides that the Nominating and Governance Committee will review and approve Related Person Transactions (as defined below); provided that the Human Resources Committee will review and approve the compensation of each employee who is an immediate family member of a director or executive officer and whose compensation exceeds $120,000. The Nominating and Governance Committee has delegated authority to its Chair to act between committee meetings.

The policy defines a “Related Person Transaction” as a transaction, arrangement or relationship (or any series of similar transactions, arrangements or relationships) in which we were, are or will be a participant and the amount involved exceeds $120,000 and in which any Related Person (as defined below) had, has or will have a direct or indirect material interest, other than:
(1)
competitively bid or regulated public utility services transactions,
(2)
transactions involving trustee type services,
(3)
transactions in which the Related Person's interest arises solely from ownership of our equity securities and all equity security holders received the same benefit on a pro rata basis,
(4)
an employment relationship or transaction involving an executive officer and any related compensation solely resulting from that employment relationship or transaction if:
(i)
the compensation arising from the relationship or transaction is or will be reported pursuant to the SEC's executive and director compensation proxy statement disclosure rules; or
(ii)
the executive officer is not an immediate family member of another executive officer or director and such compensation would have been reported under the SEC's executive and director compensation proxy statement disclosure rules as compensation earned
 
for services if the executive officer was a NEO, as that term is defined in the SEC's executive and director compensation proxy statement disclosure rules, and such compensation has been or will be approved, or recommended to our Board of Directors for approval, by the Human Resources Committee of our Board of Directors, or
(5)
if the compensation of or transaction with a director is or will be reported pursuant to the SEC's executive and director compensation proxy statement disclosure rules.

“Related Person” is defined as (1) each director, director nominee and executive officer, (2) 5% or greater beneficial owners, or (3) immediate family members of the foregoing persons.

The Nominating and Governance Committee will assess whether a proposed transaction is a Related Person Transaction for purposes of the policy. Under the policy, the Chair of the Nominating and Governance Committee has the authority to pre-approve or ratify (as applicable) any Related Person Transaction with a Related Person in which the aggregate amount involved is expected to be less than $500,000.

The policy recognizes that certain Related Person Transactions are in our and our shareholders' best interests. Each of the following Related Person Transactions are deemed to be pre-approved by the Nominating and Governance Committee pursuant to the policy, even if the aggregate amount involved will exceed $120,000:

Certain transactions with other companies. Any transaction with another company at which a Related Person's only relationship is as an employee (other than an executive officer), director or beneficial owner of less than 10% of that company's shares or other equity securities, if the aggregate amount involved does not exceed the greater of $1 million, or 2% of that company's total annual revenues.

Certain Company charitable contributions. Any charitable contribution, grant or endowment by Winnebago Industries or the Winnebago Industries Foundation to a charitable organization, foundation or university at which a Related Person's only relationship is as an employee (other than an officer), if the aggregate amount involved does not exceed $100,000.

The approval procedures in the policy identify the factors the Nominating and Governance Committee will consider in evaluating whether to approve or ratify Related Person Transactions or material amendments to pre-approved Related Person Transactions. The Nominating and Governance Committee will consider the relevant facts and circumstances, including (if applicable) but not limited to: whether the Related Person Transaction is on terms no less favorable than terms generally available to an unaffiliated third-party under the same or similar circumstances, the extent of the Related Person's interest in the transaction, and whether the proposed Related Person Transaction is in compliance with or would require disclosure under applicable SEC rules and regulations, NYSE listing requirements and our policies.


7

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

The policy provides for the annual pre-approval by the Nominating and Governance Committee of certain Related Person Transactions that are identified in the policy, as the policy may be supplemented and amended. During Fiscal 2018, the only related party transactions involved Donald Clark, one of our executive officers, who has a 20% ownership interest in Three Oaks, LLC, an entity which owns the land and building that Grand Design RV, LLC ("Grand Design") leases in order to operate its business. These related party transactions consist of the following: (i) on February 7, 2018, the lease between Three Oaks, LLC and our wholly-owned subsidiary Grand Design, dated November 8, 2016 was amended to include two additional buildings, and (ii) on July 28, 2018, Grand Design entered into an agreement to purchase approximately 31.7 acres of land from Three Oaks, LLC, which purchase is expected to close in Fiscal 2019. Grand Design has paid $1,405,286 during Fiscal 2018 to Three Oaks, LLC under its amended lease with Three Oaks, LLC, in addition to $900,000 during Fiscal 2018 to Three Oaks, LLC under its other existing lease with them, which was entered into on November 8, 2016, for a total of $2,305,286 paid to Three Oaks, LLC during Fiscal 2018 under its leases with them. Since Grand Design has not closed on the land acquisition referred to above, no amounts have yet been paid for such property; the purchase price agreed to is $729,100. Each of these transactions with Three Oaks, LLC was approved by the Nominating and Governance Committee or the full Board. At the time we acquired Grand Design in 2016, the operating agreement of Three Oaks, LLC was amended to not allow Mr. Clark to vote on any matters relating to transactions with Grand Design. In connection with our acquisition of Grand Design in November 2016, we issued 764,426 shares of our Common Stock to Mr. Clark, which represented Mr. Clark’s 1/3 interest in RDB III, Inc. one of the sellers of Grand Design. As part of the issuance of these shares to Mr. Clark, we agreed to register Mr. Clark’s shares for resale under the Securities Act of 1933 pursuant to a registration rights agreement. The Company filed an S-3 registration statement for these shares that was declared effective by the SEC in January 2017. Mr. Clark also entered into a lock-up letter agreement, which expired on November 8, 2017, pursuant to which he agreed to not transfer his shares of Common Stock. Also, in connection with the issuance of shares of Common Stock, Mr. Clark entered into a standstill agreement, which expired on November 8, 2017, which prohibited him from taking any hostile actions with respect to the Company including, but not limited to, nominating any person for the Board of Directors, forming any group as defined under the Exchange Act with other former owners of Grand Design, soliciting proxies, calling a special meeting of shareholders, or otherwise taking any actions directly or indirectly that might facilitate a strategic transaction involving the Company. There were no other Related Person Transactions to disclose.

Corporate Governance Policies and Code of Conduct

The Board of Directors has adopted a Corporate Governance Policy and written charters for its Audit Committee, Human Resources Committee, Nominating and Governance Committee and Finance Committee.

 
On August 15, 2018, the Board of Directors adopted a revised Code of Conduct applicable to all of our directors, officers, employees and business partners, which superseded the Company's previous Code of Ethics. The revised Code of Conduct incorporates a number of revisions intended to make the document more accessible, broadly applicable, comprehensive and current.

These policies, charters, codes and other items relating to our governance are available on the Corporate Governance portion of the Investor Relations section of our Web Site at http://www.winnebagoind.com. These documents are also available in print free of charge to any shareholder who requests them in writing from: Winnebago Industries, Inc., Attn: Vice President-General Counsel and Secretary, 13200 Pioneer Trail, Suite 150, Eden Prairie, MN 55347. Information contained on our Web Site is not incorporated into this Proxy Statement or other securities filings.

Director Independence

Under our Corporate Governance Policy and NYSE rules, the Board must have a majority of directors who meet the standards for independence. The Board must determine, based on a review of all of the relevant facts and circumstances, whether each director satisfies the criteria for independence. The Board undertook an annual review of director and director nominee independence. During this review, the Board considered a variety of relevant facts and circumstances, including a review of all transactions and relationships between each director and director nominee or any member of his immediate family and the Company and its subsidiaries and affiliates known to the Company. The Board also considered whether there were any transactions or relationships between directors, nominees or any member of their immediate family (or any entity of which a director, director nominee or an immediate family member is an executive officer, general partner or significant equity holder).

The purpose of this review was to determine whether any such relationships or transactions existed or exist that were inconsistent with a determination that the director or nominee is independent. As a result of this review, the Board, at its meeting in October 2018, affirmatively determined that each of Ms. Blase (Class I director), Mr. Braun (Class I director), Mr. Chiusano (Class II director), Mr. Moss (Class II director), Mr. Murabito (Class II director), Mr. Miles (Class I director), Ms. Rodamaker (Class I director), and Mr. Fisher (Class III director), are independent as defined by the relevant provisions of applicable law and the NYSE listing standards, and that each independent director and nominee has no material relationship with Winnebago Industries. As a result of this review, the Board determined that a majority of directors are independent.

All members of the Audit Committee, Human Resources Committee, Nominating and Governance Committee and Finance Committee are independent under any additional independence requirements applicable to such committees under the NYSE and SEC standards.

Mr. Happe (Class III director) is not independent because of his employment as CEO and President of the Company.

8

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

Shareholder and Other Interested Party Communications with Directors

Shareholders and other interested parties who desire to communicate with our directors or a particular director may write to: Winnebago Industries, Inc., Attn: Vice President-General Counsel and Secretary, 13200 Pioneer Trail, Suite 150, Eden Prairie, MN 55347; or e-mail: SLBogart@winnebagoind.com. All communications must be accompanied by the following information (i) if the person submitting the communication is a shareholder, a statement of the number of shares of Common Stock that the person holds; (ii) if the person submitting the communication is not a shareholder and is submitting the communication to the non-employee directors as an interested party, the nature of the person's interest in the Company; (iii) any special interest, meaning an interest not in the capacity of a shareholder, of the person in the subject matter of the communication; and (iv) the address, telephone number and e-mail address, if any, of the person submitting the communication. Communications received from shareholders and other interested parties to the Board of Directors will be reviewed by the Vice President-General Counsel and Secretary, or such other person designated by all non-employee directors of the Board, and if they are relevant and appropriate, they will be forwarded to the Board Chair or applicable Board member or members as expeditiously as reasonably practicable.

Risk Management Oversight Process

We face a number of risks, including financial, technological, operational, strategic and competitive risks. Management is responsible for the day-to-day management of risks we face, while the Board has responsibility for the oversight of risk management. In its risk oversight role, the Board reviews and monitors our processes for identification, management and mitigation of risk by our Management and assesses whether our processes are adequate and functioning as designed. 

Our Board is actively involved in overseeing risk management and it exercises its oversight both through the full Board and through four of the standing committees of the Board: the Audit Committee, the Human Resources Committee, the Nominating and Governance Committee and the Finance Committee. These standing committees exercise oversight of the risks within their areas of responsibility, as disclosed in the descriptions of each of the committees above and in the charters of each of the committees.  The Board and these committees receive information used in fulfilling their oversight responsibilities through our executive officers and other advisors, including our legal counsel, our independent registered public accounting firm, our consulting firm for internal controls over financial reporting, and the compensation consultants we have engaged from time to time.

At meetings of the Board, Management makes presentations to the Board regarding our business strategy, operations, financial performance, annual budgets, technology and other matters. Many of these presentations include information relating to the challenges and risks to our business and the
 
Board and Management actively engage in discussion on these topics. Each of the committees also receives reports from Management regarding matters relevant to the work of that committee. These Management reports are supplemented by information relating to risk from our advisors. Additionally, following committee meetings, the Board receives reports by each committee chair regarding the committee’s considerations and actions. In this way, the Board also receives additional information regarding the risk oversight functions performed by each of these committees.

Hedging and Pledging

Hedging transactions can reduce exposure to the risks of stock ownership and thereby affect alignment with the interests of our shareholders. Consequently, we do not permit directors or executive officers to engage in any transaction designed to hedge the market value of their Common Stock. Similarly, directors and executive officers may not pledge their Common Stock as collateral for any loan.


Director Compensation
In Fiscal 2017, the Human Resources Committee engaged an independent, outside compensation consultant, Willis Towers Watson, to update its analysis of the total compensation paid to the Board of Directors (hereinafter, the "2017 Compensation Analysis"). In May of Fiscal 2018, the Committee retained Semler Brossy to serve as outside compensation consultant going forward. Semler Brossy assisted the Committee in reviewing the 2017 Compensation Analysis and made recommendations regarding the types and amounts of compensation the Company pays its non-employee directors. The Committee approved increases to the non-employee directors' compensation beginning in Fiscal 2019 as described below.
Employee directors receive no additional compensation for serving on the Board or its committees. Each of our Non-Employee Directors receives an annual retainer of $75,000 payable monthly, a restricted stock award valued at $95,000, and reimbursement of expenses incurred in attending Board and committee meetings. Due to their increased responsibilities and duties, the Chair of the Board receives an additional annual retainer of $40,000, the Audit Committee Chair receives an additional annual retainer of $10,000, and the Chairs of the other Board committees also receive an additional annual retainer of $5,000.
Commencing with the October 2018 RSU award, all director awards will be prospective for the upcoming year. This means that any new directors will receive a prorated award at the next regularly scheduled Board meeting, if the next regularly scheduled Board meeting is not the meeting at which annual awards are granted. Directors who joined prior to this time will receive an award of the annual grant prior to separation of service from the Board.

9

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

Director Compensation Table

The following table sets forth the total compensation paid to each Non-Employee Director for Fiscal 2018, other than reimbursement for travel expenses:
Director
Fees Earned or
Paid in Cash(1)(2)
($)
 
Stock
 Awards(3)
($)
 
All Other
Compensation(4)
($)
 
Total ($)
Christopher J. Braun
75,000

 
95,016

 
 
170,016

Robert M. Chiusano
115,000

 
95,016

 
 
210,016

William C. Fisher
80,000

 
95,016

 
 
175,016

David W. Miles
80,000

 
95,016

 
 
175,016

Richard D. Moss
82,500

 
95,016

 
 
177,516

John M. Murabito
78,750

 
95,016

 
 
173,766

Martha T. Rodamaker
76,250

 
95,016

 
 
171,266

Mark T. Schroepfer(5)
23,669

 
113,634

 
17,593
 
154,896

(1)
Our directors may elect to receive retainer fees in cash or may defer their retainer fees into the Directors' Deferred Compensation Plan.
(2)
The Chair of the Board receives an additional $40,000 retainer per year, the Audit Committee Chair receives an additional $10,000 retainer per year, and the Chairs of the other Board committees receive an additional $5,000 retainer per year, each of which are reflected in these figures.
(3)
Other than the grant for Mr. Schroepfer, these awards are valued at $44.40 per share, the closing stock price on October 18, 2017, the date of the restricted stock grant. Mr. Schroepfer received 2,140 shares on December 6, 2017. These shares were granted at $53.10, which was the closing stock price on this date.
(4)
Other than Mr. Schroepfer, none of the directors received perquisites and other personal benefits in an aggregate amount of $10,000 or more. Mr. Schroepfer received his award on December 6, 2017 and he received a cash payment of $17,593 in December 2017 to offset lost income related to the delay in receiving his stock award (due to an inability to make an 83(b) tax election at the time he should have received his grant in October of 2017).
(5)
Mr. Schroepfer's service on the Board terminated upon the expiration of his term on December 12, 2017.

Non-Employee Director Equity Awards Outstanding as of August 25, 2018

As of August 25, 2018, our non-employee directors held the restricted stock awards and stock units set forth below. The stock units were granted under the Directors' Deferred Compensation Plan described below.

Director
Restricted Stock Awards
Stock Units
Christopher J. Braun
4,740
0
Robert M. Chiusano
20,240
24,605
William C. Fisher
16,740
6,751
David W. Miles
4,740
0
Richard D. Moss
2,140
0
John M. Murabito
2,140
0
Martha T. Rodamaker
16,240
11,692


Director Ownership Guidelines

Our Corporate Governance Policy requires us to maintain guidelines encouraging non-employee director stock ownership. The guidelines currently in effect require non-employee directors to hold Common Stock, stock units or other equity equivalents having a market value of at least 500% of their annual retainer of $75,000, and that they attain this level of stock ownership within five years of becoming a director. Based on the holdings noted above, all non-employee directors
 
have met this goal, or are on track to meet this goal, within the prescribed five-year time frame.

Directors' Deferred Compensation Plan

Effective April 1, 1997, the Board of Directors adopted the Winnebago Industries, Inc. Directors' Deferred Compensation Plan (as amended, the “Directors' Deferred Compensation Plan”). The purpose of the Directors' Deferred Compensation Plan is to enable Non-Employee Directors (the “Participants”) to receive compensation for board service in a form other than as direct payments and to defer taxes on such compensation.

A participant may elect to apply either 50% or 100% of his or her annual cash retainer amounts to either, but not both, of the following forms: “Money Credits” or “Winnebago Stock Units,” and beginning in October of 2018, may elect to defer 100% of his or her stock award as deferred compensation in the form of "Winnebago Stock Units."

Money Credits are units credited in the form of dollars in accordance with the participant's election to such participant's account established by the Company. The Money Credits accrue interest from the credit date. Presently, the interest rate to be applied to the participant's Money Credits is the 30-year Treasury bond yield as of the first business day of the plan year.

Winnebago Stock Units are units credited in the form of Common Stock of the Company in accordance with the participant's annual deferral election. The shares of our Common Stock issued in connection with our Directors' Deferred Compensation Plan consists of our treasury shares

10

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

and like all of our Common Stock, generally, will accrue dividends, if any, paid by us on our Common Stock. Winnebago Stock Units will be recorded in such participant's account on the basis of the closing price of a share of our Common Stock on the NYSE on the date upon which the account is credited.
The Winnebago stock units credited to participant's accounts are included in the Common Stock ownership table under the caption “Voting Securities and Principal Holders Thereof.” The directors, however, do not have any rights to vote or dispose of any shares of Common Stock underlying the stock units until their service as director ends or upon his or her attainment of age 69-1/2 while serving as a director.
In the event of a “change of control" of the Company, as defined in the Directors' Deferred Compensation Plan, a participant generally will receive a lump-sum distribution of his or her account within 30 days following his or her termination of service as a director after such change in control.

Director Annual Equity Grants

Under the Winnebago Industries, Inc. 2014 Omnibus Equity, Performance Award and Incentive Compensation Plan, no non-employee director may be granted, during any fiscal year, awards consisting of stock awards or performance awards covering or relating to more than 10,000 shares of Common Stock or non-qualified stock options for more than 20,000 shares of Common Stock during any fiscal year.
Beginning with the Fiscal 2019 annual stock awards, we began to grant restricted stock units rather than restricted stock to our non-employee directors. Also, each director stock award, awarded in the form of restricted stock units, will vest approximately one year from the date of the applicable grant (or, approximately 13 months in the case of the October 2018 grant only), provided that participants are restricted from selling, pledging or transferring the Common Stock underlying the vested restricted stock units until the date the participant separates from service on the Board. In the event that a participant terminates his or her service as a director prior to the vesting of the underlying restricted stock unit award, the award will be forfeited by the director. Directors also may elect to defer settlement of their vested restricted stock units until the director's service to the Company terminates.


 


Item 1: Election of Directors
Our Board of Directors is divided into three classes with staggered terms, as nearly equal in number as possible. Our bylaws provide that our Board is comprised of between three and fifteen directors. The number of directors to be elected at the Annual Meeting has been set at eight. The Board regularly reviews its composition and the mix of skills and experience of the directors. In the future, the Board may determine it is appropriate to increase its size in order to add a director or directors that would add value to the Company.

The Board of Directors of the Company adopted a majority voting policy for the election of directors in uncontested elections.  Under this policy, in any uncontested election of directors of the Company, if any nominee receives less than a majority of the votes cast for the nominee, that nominee shall still be elected, but must tender their resignation to the full Board of Directors for consideration at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board of Directors.  The Board of Directors shall only not accept the tendered resignation for, in their judgment, a compelling reason. If the Board of Directors, with the affected director not participating, does not accept the resignation at the regularly scheduled meeting following the election, then the nominee shall be considered elected and may serve out the term to which they were elected.  In any contested election of directors where the number of nominees exceeds the number of available positions, strict plurality voting shall apply.
Directors are elected for a term of three years. At the Annual Meeting, the term of office of the Class I directors (Mses. Blase and Rodamaker and Messrs. Braun and Miles) will expire. Ms. Rodamaker decided not to stand for re-election. Ms. Blase was elected as a Class I director at a special meeting of the Board on September 24, 2018, at which time the size of the Board was temporarily increased to nine. Ms. Blase and Messrs. Braun and Miles have been nominated as Class I directors. The Class I directors will be elected to serve in that class until the annual meeting following our Fiscal 2021 or until their respective successors are elected.

YOUR BOARD OF DIRECTORS UNANIMOUSLY RECOMMENDS THAT YOU VOTE FOR THE ELECTION OF THE DIRECTOR NOMINEES.


11

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

Nominees for Class I Director to be Elected to Serve Until the Annual Meeting Following Fiscal
2021:

Maria F. Blase
 
 
 
 
mariaf.jpg

Committees
Ÿ Audit
Ÿ Nominating and Governance


Age: 51
Director Since: 2018
 
Maria F. Blase, 51, currently serves as President of the Fluid Management, Material Handling and Power Tools businesses of Ingersoll Rand, a global industrial manufacturing company. Maria has 25 years of experience with diverse industries, including transport, buildings, services, manufacturing, pharmaceuticals and mining. After joining Ingersoll Rand in 1999, she was promoted to global financial roles of increasing importance, including chief financial officer of the $8 billion Climate Solutions sector. In 2013, she was named President of the HVAC and Transport Latin America business of Ingersoll Rand, and in late 2017 assumed her most recent role.

Ms. Blase is a CPA and her previous experience includes various positions at KPMG LLP from 1993 to 1999 in increasing scope and complexity. Due to Ms. Blase's relevant experience in finance, accounting and controls, the Board determined that she is an audit committee financial expert.

 
Skills and Qualifications:
 
Ms. Blase brings to the Board extensive experience in international, strategic planning, acquisitions and driving business growth. The Board believes her financial and business expertise will add valuable insights to the Board.

Christopher J. Braun
 
 
 
 
chrisbraunfinal1108.jpg

Committees
Ÿ Human Resources
Ÿ Nominating and Governance

Age: 58
Director Since: 2015

 
Christopher J. Braun, 58, has been a director since 2015. Mr. Braun has over 30 years of leadership experience encompassing manufacturing, finance and sales. He founded Teton Buildings in 2008 and held the position of CEO through 2013. His previous experience includes CEO of Teton Homes, Executive Vice President - RV Group at Fleetwood Enterprises and various senior management positions within PACCAR Corporation, manufacturer of Kenworth and Peterbilt trucks.
 
Skills and Qualifications:
 
As a recognized leader in the RV industry, Mr. Braun provides keen insights to the Board. His prior experience in the RV industry, combined with his vast manufacturing background and his role as a former CEO make him well-positioned to critically and thoughtfully review and guide the Company's strategy.

12

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

David W. Miles
 
 
 
 
davemilesfinal1099.jpg

Committees
Ÿ Audit
Ÿ Finance (Chair)

Age: 61
Director Since: 2015

 
David W. Miles, 61, a financial adviser, entrepreneur and investor, has been a director since 2015. Mr. Miles is co-founder and Managing Principal of ManchesterStory Group, an early-to-growth stage venture capital firm, chairman and principal owner of Miles Capital, Inc., a registered investment advisory firm managing investments in public equities, public debt and alternative asset classes to institutional investors, and founder and manager of The Miles Group, LLC, a firm focused on direct and indirect private equity investments. He is also a director of the Miles Funds, Inc., and a director and chair of the Audit Committee of Northwest Financial Corporation. Due to Mr. Miles' vast experience in finance and as an investment advisor, the Board determined that he is an audit committee financial expert.
 
Skills and Qualifications:
 
Mr. Miles brings legal and investment transaction experience to the Board. He also brings significant expertise in financial reporting and capital allocation strategy.

Class II Directors Whose Term Expires at the Annual Meeting Following Fiscal 2019:
Robert M. Chiusano
 
 
 
 
bobchiusanofinal1132.jpg

Committees
Ÿ Human Resources
Ÿ Finance

Age: 67
Director Since: 2008

 
Robert M. Chiusano, 67, has been a director since 2008 and was elected as Chairman of the Board in 2016. Mr. Chiusano has served as a principal in RMC Consulting, LLC, a company focused on leadership development and operational excellence, since 2007. Mr. Chiusano previously served as Executive Vice President and Special Assistant to the CEO and a former Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of both the Government and Commercial Systems business segments of Rockwell Collins, Inc. Mr. Chiusano also currently serves as an adjunct professor in the University of Iowa College of Engineering where he has served since 2001 and is a member of the Coe College Board of Trustees where he serves as the Chairman of the College Relations Committee.
 
Skills and Qualifications:
 
As the former Chief Operating Officer of both Government and Commercial Systems of Rockwell Collins, Inc., Mr. Chiusano brings senior level business leadership and strategic planning skills and an operating background to the Board. As principal of RMC Consulting, LLC, he also brings leadership development and operational excellence skills to the Board.

13

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg


Richard (Rick) D. Moss
 
 
 
 
rickmossfinal1116.jpg

Committees
Ÿ Audit (Chair)
Ÿ Finance

Age: 60
Director Since: 2017

 
Richard (Rick) D. Moss, 60, was appointed to the Board of Directors in February 2017. Most recently, Mr. Moss served as the Chief Financial Officer of Hanesbrands, Inc., a leading global basic apparel manufacturer, from 2011 until his retirement on December 31, 2017. Mr. Moss joined Hanesbrands as Senior Vice President - Finance and Treasurer and had several roles increasing in scope and complexity prior to becoming Chief Financial Officer. Prior to his roles at Hanesbrands, Mr. Moss served as CFO of Chattem Inc., a consumer products company. Mr. Moss has been a director of Nature's Sunshine Products, Inc. since May 2018, and also serves as a director for the Center for Creative Entrepreneurship and Chair of the Board of Trustees of The Arts Council of Winston-Salem/Forsyth County. Due to Mr. Moss' relevant experience in finance, accounting, and auditing, the Board determined he is an audit committee financial expert.
 
Skills and Qualifications:
 
With his many years of experience as a chief financial officer and executive at a public company, Mr. Moss provides the Board expertise in financial and strategic planning, mergers, acquisitions and integration of businesses following mergers and acquisitions, as well as capital allocation strategies and complex financial issues.

John M. Murabito
 
 
 
 
johnmurabitofinal1138a01.jpg

Committees
Ÿ Human Resources (Chair)
Ÿ Nominating and Governance

Age: 59
Director Since: 2017

 
John M. Murabito, age 59, was appointed to the Board of Directors in May 2017. He has served as the Executive Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer of Cigna Corporation, a health insurance company, since 2003. His other Human Resource leadership roles have included Chief Human Resources Officer at Monsanto Company and Group Vice President, Human Resources for Frito-Lay, Inc., a division of PepsiCo. Mr. Murabito is a Fellow and Chair of the National Academy of Human Resources, a Member of the Boards of Trustees of the Human Resources Policy Association and the American Health Policy Association, and serves as Chair of the Board of Trustees for Augustana College in Rock Island, Illinois.
 
Skills and Qualifications:
 
Mr. Murabito brings strong executive leadership and talent management expertise to our Board as a senior executive of a public company. He provides valuable insights on human capital, executive compensation, leadership development and succession planning to the Board.


14

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg


Class III Directors Whose Term Expires at the Annual Meeting Following Fiscal 2020:
Michael J. Happe
 
 
 
 
mikehfinal1080.jpg





Age: 47
Director Since: 2016

 
Michael J. Happe, 47, joined Winnebago in January 2016, as the President, CEO and a director. He previously worked at The Toro Company, a manufacturer of turf maintenance equipment and irrigation system supplies, where he most recently served as an Executive Officer and Group Vice President of Toro’s Residential and Contractor businesses, until 2015. A 19-year veteran of Toro, he held a series of senior leadership positions throughout his career across a variety of the company’s domestic and international divisions.
 
Skills and Qualifications:
 
Mr. Happe's knowledge of all aspects of the business as CEO and his drive for excellence position him well to serve on the Board. His extensive experience and positions rising in complexity and breadth at Toro, including global business affairs, brings further expertise in corporate leadership and development and execution of business growth strategy.
William C. Fisher
 
 
 
 
billfisherfinal1091.jpg

Committees
Ÿ Audit
Ÿ Nominating and Governance (Chair)

Age: 64
Director Since: 2015

 
William C. Fisher, 64, a retired business executive, has been a director since March 2015. Mr. Fisher was the Chief Information Officer from 1999 until 2007 of Polaris industries Inc., a manufacturer of power sports products. He was Vice President and CIO from November 2007 until his retirement in February 2015. During his tenure at Polaris, he also served as the General Manager of Service from 2005 until 2014 overseeing all technical, dealer, and consumer service operations. Prior to joining Polaris, Mr. Fisher was employed by MTS Systems for 15 years in various positions in information services, software engineering, control product development, and general management. Before that time, Mr. Fisher worked as a civil engineer for Anderson-Nichols and he later joined Autocon Industries, where he developed process control software.
 
Skills and Qualifications:
 
Mr. Fisher's experience as CIO at Polaris Industries has provided substantial experience in information technology and security issues. His experience in service and consumer service operations and familiarity with highly discretionary consumer products are key assets as we focus on improved service and operational efficiency.

The Nominating and Governance Committee recommended, and the Board approved, the nomination of Ms. Blase and Messrs. Braun and Miles as Class I directors.

Discretionary authority is solicited to vote for the election of a substitute for any of the Class I (Ms. Blase and Messrs. Braun and Miles) director nominees who, for any reason currently unknown, cannot be a candidate for election.




15

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg


Executive Compensation

Compensation Discussion and Analysis
The following Compensation Discussion and Analysis describes the material elements of our executive compensation program. Throughout this discussion, we refer to our NEOs. The following individuals are our NEOs for Fiscal 2018:
 

Michael J. Happe, CEO and President
Bryan L. Hughes, Vice President, CFO
Stacy L. Bogart, Vice President, General Counsel & Secretary
Donald J. Clark, President, Grand Design; Vice President, Winnebago Industries, Inc.
Brian D. Hazelton, Vice President, Motorhome Business Unit




Executive Summary
Executive Compensation Philosophy and Program Objectives

The Human Resources Committee (the "Committee") believes that the most effective compensation program is one that is designed to reward the achievement of our specific annual, long-term and strategic goals, and which aligns executives' interests with those of the shareholders by rewarding performance above established thresholds, with the ultimate objective of improving shareholder value. The Committee evaluates both performance
and compensation to ensure that we maintain our ability to attract and retain superior employees in key positions and that compensation provided to key employees remains competitive relative to the compensation paid to similarly situated executives of our Compensation Peers (as defined below). Accordingly, the Committee believes executive compensation packages provided to our executives, including the NEOs, should include both cash and stock-based
 
compensation that reward performance as measured against established goals.
The Committee has worked with management to design the current executive compensation programs, following the belief that compensation should reflect the value created for the shareholders while furthering our strategic goals. In doing so, we instituted our compensation programs to achieve the following goals:

Align the interests of management with those of shareholders;
Provide fair and competitive compensation;
Integrate compensation with our business plans;
Reward both business and individual performance; and
Attract and retain key executives critical to our success.

These objectives emphasize pay for performance by providing an incentive opportunity for performance that meets or exceeds company objectives.


Fiscal 2018 Performance Highlights

The following are highlights of the Company's financial performance in Fiscal 2018. Performance across each of these metrics were driven by organic and inorganic growth in the towables businesses, including the Company's acquisition of Grand Design (which exceeded net revenue and operating income expectations significantly in Fiscal 2018).
 
Incentive Plan
Performance(1)
Measure
Annual
Long-Term(2)
1-year
3-year(3)
Net Sales Growth
X
 
29.3%
 
Operating Income
X
 
$166,596
 
Net Working Capital
X
 
13.4%
 
Return on Equity (ROE)
 
X
 
19.7%
(1) Performance figures reflect adjustments approved by the Human Resources Committee for certain events not contemplated when creating initial targets, consisting of adjustments to each measure relating to: the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act enacted on December 22, 2017, the Company's acquisition of Chris-Craft, and transaction costs associated with the Company's acquisition of Grand Design.
(2) This column shows the sole metric used for the 2016-2018 LTIP. Metrics for the 2017-2019 LTIP were expanded to include 40% return on invested capital, 30% operating income, and 30% net sales, while the metrics for the 2018-2020 LTIP include 40% ROE, 30% operating income and 30% net sales.
(3) This column shows performance for the period from Fiscal 2016-2018.

16

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg



Impact of Performance on Fiscal 2018 Compensation

The compensation of our NEOs in Fiscal 2018 was directly impacted by our financial performance and total shareholder returns:

Performance Objective
Link to 2018 Compensation
Financial
Ÿ





Ÿ


Ÿ

For our CEO, Mr. Happe, 100% of 2018 annual incentive awards was based on achieving targeted levels of net sales growth (50%), operating income (40%), and working capital (10%) at the company level. For all NEOs other than Mr. Clark, 90% of 2018 annual incentive awards was tied to these metrics at either the company or business unit level. The other 10% was tied to individual metrics aligned with goals deemed important to advancing business objectives.
Pursuant to the terms of his employment agreement, Mr. Clark's incentive compensation is tied 100% to the pretax net income of the Grand Design business that is part of our Towables segment.
In addition, vesting for the Fiscal 2016-2018 LTIP awards was tied 100% to our three-year average ROE.
Total Shareholder Returns
Ÿ

Ÿ
With the exception of Mr. Clark, 46% of our NEO compensation on average was delivered in the form of company equity awards (57% in the case of our CEO).
25% of the annual equity grants made in Fiscal 2018 were in the form of stock options, which only have value to the executive if the value of the Company grows for our shareholders.

The Company had strong financial performance for Fiscal 2018 as shown in the "Fiscal 2018 Performance Highlights" table on page 16. Based on our performance as measured against predefined goals, the 2016-2018 LTIP paid out at 150% of target, and the Fiscal 2018 annual incentive plan paid out as follows for all NEOs, except for Mr. Clark: 130.1% of target for Mr. Happe, 126.6% of target for Mr. Hughes, 130.1% of target for Ms. Bogart, and 56.3% of target for Mr. Hazelton.

Mr. Clark received a cash incentive award of $4,574,000 in Fiscal 2018, which is a 69% increase compared to 2017, based on the strong performance of Grand Design during 2018. This incentive was paid in four quarterly installments.

Other Pay and Governance Practices

The Company has adopted the following key programs, policies and practices to respond to evolving good governance practices in executive compensation and enhance the alignment of our executive compensation programs and shareholder interests:

What we do
ü
ü

ü
ü


ü
ü
ü
ü
Tie the majority of target total compensation to performance
Provide appropriate mix of fixed and variable pay to reward company, line of business, and individual performance
Align executive interests with the interests of the shareholders through equity-based awards
Include "clawback" provisions for each of the annual and long-term incentive programs, which provide for the recoupment of incentive compensation payouts following a restatement due to material noncompliance with financial reporting requirements
Align our performance goals and measures with our strategy and operating plan
Maintain meaningful executive and director stock ownership guidelines
Conduct annual "say-on-pay" advisory votes
Use an outside, independent third-party advisor to provide objective compensation advice
What we don't do
û
û
û

û
û
û
û
Provide excessive severance benefits to our executive officers
Provide tax gross-ups, including excise tax gross-ups upon change in control
Make equity awards subject to automatic acceleration of vesting (i.e., "single-trigger") upon change in control (as of Fiscal 2019)
Allow for hedging or speculative trading of Company securities by executives or directors
Reprice options without shareholder approval
Provide significant perquisites
Allow for pledging by our executives and directors

The Committee has made three specific changes applicable in Fiscal 2019 based on a review of market standards for good governance:


17

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

Revised executive change in control agreements to (1) reduce severance multiples (for executives other than the CEO and Mr. Clark), (2) make severance payable only as to salary and target annual incentives (previous severance agreements provided for severance on total taxable compensation, including equity awards), (3) adjust the definition of Change in Control to align with current market practices, and (4) reduce the amount of time after a Change in Control that a termination of employment can trigger a severance obligation from three years to two years.
Revised the equity award agreements so that all future equity awards will be subject to “double trigger” accelerated vesting following a change in control (i.e., vesting only accelerates following a change in control if the executive’s employment is also terminated) rather than the prior “single trigger” vesting provisions
Increased the stock ownership guideline for our CEO from 4x salary to 5x salary
The Committee did not make any changes to Mr. Clark’s employment or change in control agreements given the unique nature of his employment arrangements with the Company.


Advisory Vote on Executive Compensation

At our 2017 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, our shareholders voted to approve on an advisory basis the compensation of our NEOs. 98.5% of the votes cast with respect to this proposal were cast for approval of our NEOs' compensation. The Committee determined that our current
 
executive compensation philosophy and compensation elements continued to be appropriate. We conduct regular investor outreach in the form of investor calls, attendance at investor conferences, execution of non-deal roadshows, and hosting of quarterly earnings calls with open Q&A. We continue to evaluate and refine our compensation programs on a regular basis, and view the advisory vote as a helpful gauge of our compensation design.


Elements of Fiscal 2018 Compensation

The table below lays out the Fiscal 2018 compensation elements for all NEOs other than Mr. Clark.
 
Element
Mechanics
Rationale
Paid in Cash
Salary
Weekly payments
Values correspond to experience and job scope
Provides competitive fixed pay to attract employees
Officers Incentive Compensation Plan (OICP)
Annual payout tied to performance against pre-determined metrics and goals across a one-year performance period
For Fiscal 2018, the metrics included:
Ÿ 90% financial objectives
ú 50% Net Sales Growth
ú 40% Operating Income
ú 10% Net Working Capital
Ÿ 10% Individual Objectives
Payouts range from 0% - 200% of a pre-determined target value
Incentivizes achievement of key annual objectives at an enterprise-wide or individual business unit level - driving progress towards achievement of long-term initiatives
Paid in Equity
Long-Term Incentive Program (LTIP) / Performance Shares
50% of all annual Equity Awards
For the Fiscal 2018-2020 performance period, payouts are tied to performance against pre-determined goals across a three-year performance period
The metrics consist of:
Ÿ 30% Net Sales
Ÿ 30% Operating Income
Ÿ 40% ROE
Payouts range from 0% - 150% of a pre-determined target value
Rewards for achievement of specific long-term financial objectives
Aligns NEOs' interest with long-term shareholder value creation
Stock Options
25% of all annual Equity Awards
Stock options can be exercised over ten years and vest over three years in equal installments
Aligns NEOs’ interest with long-term shareholder value creation as measured by appreciation in stock price from the date of grant
Restricted Stock
25% of all annual Equity Awards
Restricted stock grants vest over three years in equal installments
Aligns NEOs’ interest with long-term shareholder value creation
Encourages executive retention

In connection with our acquisition of Grand Design, we entered into an employment agreement with Mr. Clark in November 2016. Under the employment agreement, Mr. Clark is paid an annual base salary of $400,000, and is eligible to receive a cash incentive

18

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

bonus pursuant to the pre-existing Grand Design Management Incentive Plan. Payment under this plan is 100% dependent on pre-tax net income performance of the Grand Design business, a part of our Towables segment. Mr. Clark is not eligible to participate in any other Winnebago cash or stock incentive program.
 

Performance-based Pay Mix
Consistent with the Committee’s commitment to a strong, positive link between our business objectives, our performance and our executive compensation practices, we have placed a significant emphasis on pay “at risk,” based on the achievement of established business objectives and shareholder value creation. The following charts illustrate the components of our Chief Executive Officer’s total direct compensation, as well as the average total direct compensation for our other NEOs, excluding Mr. Clark, for Fiscal 2018. 79% of our Chief Executive Officer's total direct compensation and 67% of the average total direct compensation of our other NEOs was performance-based pay, including annual incentive compensation and annual equity grants, with a significant emphasis on long-term performance and shareholder value creation. For the purposes of these charts, total direct compensation includes salary, actual annual incentive compensation, and the grant date fair value of our annual equity grants made in Fiscal 2018, as reported in the Summary Compensation Table (and excludes benefits and other compensation).
chart1.jpg


Determination of Compensation
Role of the Human Resources Committee

The Committee is responsible for reviewing and approving, on an annual basis, the corporate goals and objectives with respect to the compensation of all of our executive officers, as described in the Committee Charter. The Committee relies on its own review and the advice of its independent compensation consultant in establishing executive officer pay. The Compensation Committee seeks the input of the CEO in making executive officer pay decisions for all executives other than himself, but the Committee makes all decisions.

In October 2017, the Committee approved annual incentive performance objectives for Fiscal 2018 and long-term incentive awards to our NEOs under our 2014 Omnibus Equity, Performance Award and Incentive Compensation Plan (the “2014 Plan”). After the completion of Fiscal 2018, the Committee (i) approved 2018 annual incentive payouts for our NEOs based on the achievement of the performance objectives established at the beginning of the year, and (ii)
 
certified achievement of performance objectives with respect to the LTIP performance share awards granted to then-current executives in Fiscal 2016 that had a performance period running from Fiscal 2016-2018. In October 2018, the Committee approved annual incentive performance objectives for Fiscal 2019 and granted long-term incentive awards to our executive officers under the 2014 Plan, including LTIP performance share units, stock options and restricted stock units.

Role of the Compensation Consultant

The Committee retained Willis Towers Watson through March 2018 as its executive compensation consultant.
Retained by and reporting directly to the Human Resources Committee, Willis Towers Watson provided the Committee with assistance in evaluating Winnebago’s executive compensation programs and policies, and, where appropriate, assisted with the redesign and enhancement of elements of the programs. The scope of the consultant’s support included:

Review of annual and long-term incentive designs and

19

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

assistance with determination of annual and long-term incentive awards (including the Fiscal 2018 awards)
Review of the total compensation program, including competitive peer group analysis and analysis of executive pay levels in relation to broader market survey data
Review information provided to the Committee by management, and develop recommendations with respect to CEO compensation decisions and provide advice to the Committee on the compensation decisions affecting all executives, including the NEOs
Attend and participate in Committee meetings as requested by the Committee
Report on compensation trends and best practices, plan design, and the reasonableness of individual compensation awards
Meet with the Committee and/ or its members without management present

In April 2018, the Committee selected Semler Brossy to act as its independent compensation consultant. Semler Brossy assisted the Committee in its final determination of Fiscal 2018 payouts and provided assistance to the Committee with respect to proxy disclosure issues. The scope of its assignments for Fiscal 2019 executive compensation are substantially similar to those of Willis Towers Watson described above.
Neither Willis Towers Watson nor Semler Brossy provided any services to us other than those detailed above. The Committee determined that no conflicts of interest exist with respect to either Willis Towers Watson or Semler Brossy serving as an advisor to the Committee. In making this determination, the Committee considered various factors, including those set forth in the SEC’s and NYSE’s rules.
Role of Management

Our CEO and our other executive officers do not set their own compensation nor are they present when the Committee sets their specific individual compensation. Our CEO provides his evaluation of each executive officer’s performance to the Committee, and makes recommendations with respect to base salary and target incentives, incentive awards and equity awards for each executive officer other than himself. This recommendation is considered by the Committee, which makes its own ultimate determinations.
The Human Resources Department provides additional analysis and guidance as requested by the Committee related to NEO compensation, including the following:

Developing, summarizing and presenting information and analyses to enable the Human Resources Committee to execute its responsibilities, as well as addressing specific requests for information from the Committee
Attending Committee meetings as requested to provide information, respond to questions and otherwise assist the Committee
Assisting the CEO in making preliminary recommendations of base salary structure, annual and LTI program design and target award levels for the NEOs and other employees eligible to receive annual
 
incentive awards.

Pay Positioning and Compensation Peers

When setting Fiscal 2018 compensation, the Committee focused on trying to set pay levels, in the aggregate, within a competitive range of the market median. Some roles may be higher or lower in the competitive range based on performance, tenure in role, or other internal considerations. Competitive market data is only one of several resources made available to the Committee to assist it in setting executive compensation levels. The Committee does not use the median as a formula to determine compensation or as a fixed target.
The Committee establishes an individual annual bonus and equity incentive target opportunity for each NEO based on the Committee’s evaluation of the executive’s experience, level and scope of responsibility and individual performance. Actual cash compensation may be more or less than the target opportunity as a result of performance under the incentive plan. Realized compensation from our equity-based awards may be more or less than the target opportunity as a result of our performance relative to the LTIP measures and our stock price performance.
In setting compensation, the Committee compares base salaries, annual incentive opportunities and long-term compensation for the NEOs to a peer group of similarly sized companies (which we refer to collectively as our Compensation Peers). For Fiscal 2018, the Committee used the following set of companies that were determined to have similarly sized revenues and market values.
A. O. Smith
Polaris Industries
Alamo Group
REV Group
American Railcar Industries
Shiloh Industries
Blue Bird
Standard Motor Products
Federal Signal
Standex International
FreightCar America
Tennant Company
Gentherm Incorporated
The Toro Company
Graco
Thor Industries
LCI Industries
Wabash National
Patrick Industries
 
Based on a review conducted by Semler Brossy, the Committee made the following changes to the peer group for setting compensation levels for Fiscal 2019 with the intent to better reflect our business dynamics following the integration of the Grand Design acquisition:

20

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

Removed (6 companies)
Added (7 companies)
A.O. Smith
Altra Industrial Motion
Alamo Group
Brunswick
American Railcar Industries
Commercial Vehicle
FreightCar America
Cooper-Standard
Graco
Horizon Global
Standex International
Hyster-Yale
 
Spartan Motors



Fiscal 2018 NEO Compensation Decisions
Base Salary

We provide NEOs and other employees with base salary to compensate them for services rendered during the fiscal year. Base salary ranges for NEOs are determined for each executive based on his or her position and responsibilities.
 
The base salaries of our executives are also determined by considering such factors as:

Experience of the executive
Time in position
Individual performance
Level of responsibility for the executive
Economic conditions, Company performance, financial condition and strategic goals
Competitive market data provided by the Committee’s independent compensation consultant

In general, base salary determinations are considered each year as part of the Committee's review process as well as upon a promotion or other change in job responsibility. Base salary is also used as the basis for calculating annual and long-term incentive awards and in calculating payments that may be paid upon a change in control, as described below. In October 2017, as a result of a review of performance, consideration of the above referenced factors, and with input from the independent compensation consultant and our CEO, the Committee recommended and approved the following increases for Fiscal 2018:


Name
FY18 Salary
FY17 Salary
% Increase
Michael J. Happe
$
675,000

$
625,000

8.0
%
Bryan L. Hughes
$
461,250

$
450,000

2.5
%
Stacy L. Bogart
$
415,000

N/A

N/A

Donald J. Clark
$
400,000

$
400,000

%
Brian D. Hazelton
$
477,400

$
463,500

3.0
%



Annual Incentive Plan - Officers' Incentive Compensation Plan (OICP)

The OICP is designed to motivate and reward the successful completion of our annual performance goals as set by the Committee. The amount of the participants' incentive compensation earned for a given fiscal year is calculated under the OICP to be in direct proportion to our financial performance expressed as a percentage (Financial Factor) against compensation targets for each participant as determined by the Committee. OICP awards are earned to the extent we meet or exceed annual financial targets as well as business unit and individual performance goals.
Each NEO, except for Mr. Clark, is eligible for a target award, denominated as a percentage of base salary paid during the
 
fiscal year. NEOs may earn from 0% of the target award under the OICP up to a maximum of 200% of the target award. In setting the target award percentages for the NEOs, the Committee considers competitive data in the compensation peer studies, individual performance evaluations, and internal equity factors.

Fiscal 2018 OICP

The following table reflects the Fiscal 2018 year-end salary, target OICP percentage and dollar amounts, and actual OICP percentage and dollar amounts earned by the NEOs, each as approved by the Committee.











21

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg






The amounts paid to our NEOs for 2018 performance were approved by the Committee on October 15, 2018 and are set forth in the Summary Compensation Table on page 27 and in the table below.
 
 
FY18 Target OICP
FY18 Actual OICP
Name
FY18 Salary ($)
% of Salary

Target Award ($)
% of Target

$
Michael J. Happe
675,000
100
%
675,000
130.1
%
855,658
Bryan L. Hughes(1)
461,250
70
%
322,875
126.6
%
405,277
Stacy L. Bogart(2)
415,000
60
%
249,000
130.1
%
211,813
Donald J. Clark(3)
N/A
N/A

N/A
N/A

N/A
Brian D. Hazelton(4)
477,400
65
%
310,310
56.3
%
173,054
(1) Mr. Hughes' bonus target percentage increased from 60% to 70% for Fiscal 2018.
(2) Reported salary and target award represent annualized amounts. Given Ms. Bogart's January 2018 hire date, her actual award for Fiscal 2018 was prorated based upon time in position.
(3) Mr. Clark does not participate in the OICP. For Fiscal 2018, Mr. Clark received an incentive of $4,574,055 under the grandfathered Grand Design Management Incentive Plan that he participates in, which is a 69% increase compared to 2017, based on the strong performance of Grand Design during Fiscal 2018. Mr. Clark's incentive under such plan is calculated as 3% of the pre-tax net income of Grand Design (before taking into account any bonus payments thereunder).
(4) Mr. Hazelton's bonus target percentage increased from 60% to 65% for Fiscal 2018.



Net sales growth, operating income, net working capital, and individual objectives were chosen by the Committee as the key financial performance measurements under the OICP for Fiscal 2018. The Committee selected these as key financial performance metrics because they are closely aligned with the business strategy:

Financial Performance Metrics (100% of OICP for Mr. Happe, and 90% of OICP for Ms. Bogart and Messrs. Hughes and Hazelton)
Net Sales Growth (50%) - focuses on overall enterprise and business unit growth and also drives customer focus
Operating Income (40%) - reinforces the importance of profitable growth across the enterprise
Net Working Capital (10%) - helps measure overall financial health of the enterprise
 
Individual objectives (10% of the OICP for Ms. Bogart and Messrs. Hughes and Hazelton) - provides actionable objectives controllable by the individual to achieve financial/ non-financial goals.

For corporate NEOs, Messrs. Happe and Hughes and Ms. Bogart, the OICP is measured against enterprise-wide performance. For business unit heads, including Mr. Hazelton, the OICP is measured against both enterprise-wide and specific business unit performance. Mr. Clark does not participate in the OICP.





Enterprise-Wide Financial Performance (100% of the OICP for Mr. Happe and 90% for Mr. Hughes and Ms. Bogart; 36% of the OICP for Mr. Hazelton)(1)(2) 

Metric
Weight
Threshold (16% Payout)
Target
(100% Payout)
Maximum (200% Payout)
FY18 Performance
Actual Payout % (Weighted)
Net Sales Growth
50
%
10.8
%
21.5
%
32.3
%
29.3
%
82.7
%
Operating Income
40
%
$128,229
$160,287
$192,362
$166,596
40.0
%
Net Working Capital
10
%
14.1
%
12.8
%
11.5
%
13.4
%
7.4
%
 
 
 
 
Total Payout Percentage
 
130.1
%
(1) Each of the participating NEOs, other than Messrs. Happe and Clark, also have 10% of their target bonus opportunities tied to individualized objectives, which are assessed by the CEO (or, the Committee, in the case of the CEO), and the proposed bonus amount is approved by the Committee.
(2) 54% of the OICP for Mr. Hazelton is based upon the following Motorhome business unit performance metrics: (i) 50% Net Sales Growth, (ii) 40% Operating Income and (iii) 10% Net Working Capital.



22

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg




23

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

Fiscal 2018 Equity Awards
We recognize long-term incentive opportunity as an important element of the total executive compensation program for NEOs. Long-term incentives are intended to retain and motivate executives and to encourage a strong link between management objectives and shareholder long-term interests.

In Fiscal 2018 we awarded long-term incentives under our 2014 Plan, pursuant to the Fiscal 2018 Long-Term Incentive Plan. We awarded equity in the form of performance shares (LTIP), restricted shares, and stock options.

LTIP / Performance Shares

Each year, the Committee establishes a three-year performance plan to promote our long-term growth and profitability and to attract and retain executives by providing the officers an opportunity for an incentive award consisting of performance shares of the Company's Common Stock. Under each Long-Term Incentive Plan, the amount of an NEO's performance share incentive compensation for the three-year period is calculated to be in direct linear proportion to our measured financial performance expressed as a percentage against compensation targets as approved by the Committee.

In general, the awards are based upon our financial performance as measured against the specific three-year plan established by the Committee. The Committee has established financial measurements and awards for each specific three-year plan (as defined in the following chart).
 

For the Fiscal 2018-2020 LTIP, the Committee selected the following metrics:

Metric
Weight
Net Sales
30%
Operating Income
30%
ROE
40%

The Committee determined that the LTIP performance share awards, if earned, would also be made subject to an additional one-year holding period following the grant of the shares, in order to encourage stock ownership, promote our long-term growth and profitability and mitigate risk.

Restricted Shares

NEOs were granted restricted shares in Fiscal 2018 that vest in three equal annual installments, beginning on the first anniversary of the grant date.

Stock Options

NEOs were granted stock options in Fiscal 2018 that vest over three years in equal installments, beginning on the first anniversary of the grant date, and can be exercised over ten years.


Fiscal 2018 Awards

The target value of the long-term incentive awards granted to the NEOs in Fiscal 2018 was as follows:
 
 
 
Total Equity
Name
LTIP / Performance Shares (50%) ($)
Restricted Shares (25%) ($)
Stock Options (25%) ($)
FY 2018 ($)
FY 2017 ($)
% Increase(1)
Michael J. Happe
828,104
414,074
414,062
1,656,241
1,252,145
32.3
 %
Bryan L. Hughes
247,486
123,743
123,753
494,981
451,886
9.5
 %
Stacy L. Bogart(2)
146,653
554,500
0
701,153
N/A
N/A

Donald J. Clark(3)
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A

Brian D. Hazelton(4)
243,578
121,789
121,802
487,170
608,468
(19.9
)%
(1) To perform this calculation, we assumed that the Fiscal 2017 and Fiscal 2018 equity awards were earned at target.
(2) Ms. Bogart received a new hire stock award of 10,000 shares of restricted stock on January 2, 2018 and a pro-rated Fiscal 2018-2020 LTIP award with a target value of 3,303 shares.
(3) Under the terms of his employment agreement, Mr. Clark is not eligible to participate in the Company's equity plans or receive any equity awards.
(4) Mr. Hazelton received a new hire stock award of 4,000 shares on August 26, 2016.

Payout of the Fiscal 2016-2018 LTIP Cycle

Prior to the Fiscal 2017-2019 LTIP, the award opportunity was expressed as a target dollar value rather than a number of shares, with the payment delivered in the form of restricted stock as determined at the end of the three-year performance period, with a one-year holding requirement following the grant of shares.

24

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg


For the Fiscal 2016-2018 LTIP, the Committee used the metric of return on equity, or ROE, which is an additional financial metric separate from the metrics utilized under the OICP, as it provides another measurement of NEO effectiveness. The awards were determined based on our three-year average ROE performance. The payout scale for the ROE measure below provided for a minimum award of 0% of the shares granted and a maximum award of 150% of the shares granted. Actual ROE for the Fiscal 2016-2018 LTIP was 19.7%, thus 150% of the incentive opportunity was achieved. The table below reflects the amount paid to eligible NEOs under the Fiscal 2016-2018 LTIP.

Metric
Weight
Threshold (10% Payout)
Target (100% Payout)
Maximum (150% Payout)
FY 16-18 Performance
Actual Payout %
ROE (3-year cumulative)
100.0%
12.7%
15.9%
19.1%
19.7%
150.0%


For the Fiscal 2016-2018 LTIP, out of our current NEOs, only Mr. Happe was employed at the time of the award and eligible to participate in the award. Mr. Happe received $719,231, which was 150% of his target Fiscal 2016-2018 LTIP award of $479,487.



Benefits
Our NEOs are eligible to participate in the same benefit plans designed for all of our full-time employees. The basic insurance package includes health, dental, disability and basic group life insurance.

Except as specifically summarized in this Compensation Discussion and Analysis, we do not currently provide payments and benefits for NEOs following his or her retirement, including, but not limited to, tax-qualified defined benefit plans and supplemental executive retirement plans.

Profit Sharing and Deferred Savings and Investment Plan

We maintain a 401(k) plan, the Winnebago Industries, Inc. Profit Sharing and Deferred Savings and Investment Plan (the "401(k) Plan"), which is a tax-qualified defined contribution plan maintained for the benefit of substantially all hourly and salaried employees, including our executives. The 401(k) Plan offers NEOs and all other employees the opportunity to defer a percentage of income that is a part of their base compensation. Effective January 1, 2018, the Company matching contribution increased to $0.50 per $1.00 of employee contribution up to 6% of the base compensation deferred by employees (subject to IRS limits and non-discrimination testing), subject to a 2-year, pro-rata vesting period. Although executives, including the NEOs, are eligible to participate in the 401(k) Plan, the application of the annual limitation on contributions under the Internal Revenue Code prevents executives from participating at the same level as non-executives. This compensation element is tax-deferred and is not intended to affect the value of any other compensation element.




 
Executive Deferred Compensation Plan (2007) (Non-Qualified Deferred Compensation Plan)

Under the Executive Deferred Compensation Plan, executive officers and certain key employees may annually choose to defer up to 50% of their salary and up to 100% of their cash incentive awards. The Committee may, from time to time and in its sole and absolute discretion, select the available investments in which a participant's deferred benefit account may be deemed invested and each participant may designate the investments in which his or her deferred benefit account will be deemed invested. The Company does not provide any matching contributions to the Executive Deferred Compensation Plan.

Perquisites

We provide NEOs with limited perquisites that the Committee believes are reasonable and consistent with the overall compensation program to better enable us to attract and retain superior employees for key positions. The Committee periodically reviews the levels of perquisites and other personal benefits provided to NEOs. Based upon this periodic review, perquisites are awarded or adjusted on an individual basis. NEOs are not automatically awarded all, or in equal amounts, perquisites granted by the Company.

The perquisites provided to our NEOs include:

Executive Physical. In an effort to encourage executives to monitor and maintain good health, we pay for voluntary annual physical examinations for executives, including the NEOs.
Recreational Vehicle Use. Our executives, including NEOs, have the opportunity to utilize our recreational vehicles on a periodic and temporary basis. We encourage the executive to have a first-hand understanding of the recreational vehicle lifestyle experienced by our customers and to provide the executive with the opportunity to

25

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

evaluate product design and efficiency.
Company Aircraft. Our aircraft, which was only in service for approximately 6 weeks during Fiscal 2018, is intended to be used only in the conduct of official Company business and was only used for official Company business during Fiscal 2018.
Car Allowance. A car allowance is provided as
 
frequent travel is required.
Financial & Tax Planning. To address complex tax and financial situations, a tax and financial planning payment is provided.




Additional Compensation Policies
Stock Ownership Guidelines

The Committee has adopted Stock Ownership Guidelines for executives. In general, each executive has five years from the date he or she becomes an executive to accumulate the appropriate number of shares. In addition, each executive is required to retain 50% of any after tax shares received from the vesting of awards or exercise of stock options until his or her ownership guideline is met. The purpose of the guidelines is to encourage our executive officers to own and retain Company shares, thereby aligning their interests with our shareholders.
We review our stock ownership guidelines on a periodic basis. During our most recent evaluation in Fiscal 2018, we increased our CEO's ownership multiple from 4x to 5x base salary to align more closely with current market practices. The table below describes the current ownership guidelines for the NEOs. Each of our NEOs has either met his or her stock ownership guideline goal or is on track to meet this goal within the prescribed five-year time frame.

 
Stock Ownership Guideline
Name
% of Salary
$ Value
Michael J. Happe
500%
3,125,000
Bryan L. Hughes
250%
1,153,125
Stacy L. Bogart
250%
1,037,500
Donald J. Clark
250%
1,000,000
Brian D. Hazelton
250%
1,193,500



Severance and Change in Control Arrangements

Employment Agreements

Mr. Happe and Mr. Clark are the only executives with individual employment agreements with the Company. In addition, these are the only agreements that provide for severance following a termination of employment outside of a change in control of the Company.

If Mr. Happe is terminated by the Company without “Cause” or terminates employment with the Company for “Good Reason” (as such terms are defined in his employment agreement), he is entitled to severance pay of his base salary for 12 months, health insurance for 12 months, accrued unused vacation pay and a pro-rata annual incentive bonus computed at target. Mr. Happe also is subject to one-year non-competition and non-solicitation covenants following termination of employment.

If Mr. Clark is terminated by the Company without “Cause” or
 
terminates employment with the Company for “Good Reason” (as such terms are defined in his employment agreement), he is entitled to severance pay of his base salary for 12 months and any earned but unpaid incentive bonus due under the Grand Design Management Incentive Plan through the fiscal quarter in which the termination occurred. Mr. Clark is subject to a non-compete and non-solicitation covenant that terminates in November 2021.

Executive Change in Control Agreement

Each of the NEOs, including Mr. Happe and Mr. Clark, have also entered into an Executive Change of Control Agreement with the Company.

The Executive Change of Control Agreements generally provide that, in the event of a termination of the executive's employment (for a reason other than death, disability, willful misconduct, normal retirement or, under certain circumstances, a voluntary termination of employment by the executive) within two years of a change of control, such executive will receive a cash severance payment and

26

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

certain other benefits. Benefits under the agreements are triggered by a termination of employment within three years of the change of control and the cash severance payment is defined as a multiple of three times the average of the aggregate annual taxable earnings paid to the executive during the three fiscal years immediately preceding the change of control. On October 15, 2018, the Committee approved new form agreements which the executives other than Mr. Clark are expected to enter into prior to December 31, 2018, which will result in: (a) limiting the severance trigger to a termination of employment occurring within two years of a Change in Control, (b) paying severance only relative to salary and target annual incentives rather than aggregate annual taxable earnings, and (c) a severance multiple of two times rather than three times base and bonus for all executives other than Mr. Happe. The new agreements also revise the definition of Change in Control to make it consistent with current market practices. We also changed the definition of Change in Control for our Fiscal 2019 awards granted in October 2018, as described further under "Change in Control Definitions and Triggers" on page 32. These changes were intended to align the Company’s practices with market standard practices among our peers. Due to the unique nature of Mr. Clark’s employment and compensation arrangements with the Company entered into in connection with the Grand Design acquisition, no changes were made to Mr. Clark’s Executive Change of Control Agreement.

The Committee believes these agreements are an important part of the total executive compensation program because they protect our interest in the continuity and stability of the executive group. The Committee also believes that these agreements reduce the executives' interest in working against a potential change of control and help to keep them focused on minimizing interruptions in business operations by reducing any concerns they may have of being terminated prematurely and without cause during any ownership transition. See “Potential Payments upon Termination or Change of Control-Executive Change of Control Agreements” below for additional detail.

Insider Trading and Hedging 

With respect to the Company's Insider Trading Policy, the policy prohibits the unauthorized disclosure of any nonpublic information acquired in the workplace and the misuse of Material Nonpublic Information (as defined in the policy) in securities trading. Additionally, pursuant to the Insider Trading Policy, all directors, officers and employees are prohibited at all times from (a) holding any Company securities in a margin account; (b) engaging in any transactions involving puts, calls, or other derivative transactions relating to the Company's securities; and (c) short-selling or pledging securities of the Company.

Clawback Policy

Beginning with Fiscal 2012 incentive compensation programs, the Committee has included “clawback” provisions for each of the OICP and LTIP which, in part, provide for the recoupment of incentive compensation payouts in the event that payments are made based upon
 
the achievement of financial results that are subsequently subject to a restatement due to material noncompliance with financial reporting requirements. In addition, the Committee will amend its clawback policy as appropriate to comply with the requirements of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the "Dodd-Frank Act").

Tax Considerations

Deductibility of Executive Compensation

Section 162(m) of the Code, as in effect prior to the enactment of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (the "Tax Cuts Act") in December 2017, generally disallowed a tax deduction to public companies for compensation of more than $1 million paid in any taxable year to each “covered employee,” consisting of the CEO and the three other highest paid executive officers employed at the end of the year (other than the CFO). Performance-based compensation was exempt from this deduction limitation if the Company met specified requirements set forth in the Internal Revenue Code and applicable treasury regulations. As a general matter, in making its previous NEO compensation decisions, our Committee was mindful of the benefit to us of the full deductibility of compensation, while believing that we should maintain flexibility in compensating our executive officers in a manner that could best promote our corporate objectives.

The Tax Cuts Act retained the $1 million deduction limit, but repealed the performance-based compensation exemption from the deduction limit and expanded the definition of “covered employees,” effective for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017. Consequently, compensation paid in Fiscal 2019 and later years to our NEOs in excess of $1 million will not be deductible unless it qualifies for transitional relief applicable to certain binding, written performance-based compensation arrangements that were in place as of November 2, 2017. No assurance can be given that the compensation associated with these awards will qualify for the transitional relief, due to ambiguities and uncertainties as to the application and interpretation of newly revised Section 162(m) and the related requirements for transitional relief.

Section 409A of the Internal Revenue Code

Section 409A of the Internal Revenue Code deals specifically with non-qualified deferred compensation plans. Although the Company makes no guarantees with respect to exemption from, or compliance with, Section 409A of the Internal Revenue Code, we have designed all of our executive benefit plans and severance arrangements with the intention that they are exempt from, or otherwise comply with, the requirements of Section 409A of the Internal Revenue Code.


27

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

Human Resources Committee Report
The Human Resources Committee of the Board of Directors of Winnebago Industries, Inc. has reviewed and discussed the foregoing Compensation Discussion and Analysis as required by Item 402(b) of Regulation S-K with management and, based on such review and discussion, the Committee recommended to the Board of Directors that the Compensation Discussion and Analysis be included in the Annual Report on Form 10-K and this Proxy Statement.

Human Resources Committee:
John M. Murabito, Chair
Robert M. Chiusano
Christopher J. Braun

 
Human Resources Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation

The current members of the Human Resources Committee of the Board of Directors, Messrs. Murabito, Chiusano and Braun, were not at any time during Fiscal 2018 or at any other time a Winnebago Industries officer or employee, and no member had any relationship with the Company requiring disclosure under applicable SEC rules. No executive officer has served on the board of directors or compensation committee of any other entity that has or has had one or more executive officers who served as a member of our Board of Directors or the Human Resources Committee during Fiscal 2018.


Compensation Tables and Narrative Disclosure

Summary Compensation Table

The following tables set forth compensation information for our NEOs for services rendered in all capacities to Winnebago Industries and its subsidiaries in Fiscal years 2018, 2017, and 2016. Presentation of the reported compensation information for these years has been recast from prior years to conform to the way in which Fiscal 2018 information is reported, consistent with SEC reporting rules.
Name and Principal Position
Year
Salary ($)
Bonus ($)
Stock
Awards(1) ($)
Option Awards(2)
($)
Non-Equity Incentive
Plan
Compensation(3) ($)
Changes in Pension Value and Non-qualified Deferred Compensation Earnings ($)
All
Other
Compensation ($)(4)
Total ($)
Michael Happe
2018
$657,692
-
$1,242,179
$414,062
$855,658
-
$44,082
$3,213,673
President, CEO
2017
$599,038
-
$1,004,291
$247,854
$902,152
-
$29,843
$2,783,178
 
2016
$338,461
-
$758,835
$115,800
$225,280
-
$2,218
$1,440,594
Bryan L. Hughes
2018
$457,356
-
$371,228
$123,753
$405,277
-
$37,446
$1,395,060
   Vice President, CFO
2017
$298,846
-
$451,886
-
$134,497
-
$6,370
$891,599
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Stacy L. Bogart(5)
2018
$271,346
$50,000
$701,153
-
$211,813
-
$25,248
$1,259,560
Vice President, General
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Counsel and Secretary
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Donald J. Clark
2018
$400,000
-
-
-
$4,574,055
-
-
$4,974,055
President, Grand Design
2017
$330,769
-
-
-
$2,700,915
-
-
$3,031,684
   Vice President, Winnebago
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   Industries, Inc.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Brian D. Hazelton
2018
$472,588
-
$365,368
$121,802
$173,054
-
$39,945
$1,172,757
Vice President and
2017
$558,827
-
$551,208
$57,260
$207,298
-
$23,089
$1,397,682
General Manager,
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Motorhomes
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

28

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

(1)
The table below illustrates the three categories of stock awards as presented above:
 
 
 
 
Performance-Based Plans
 
 
Name
Fiscal
Year
Non-Performance-
Based Restricted
Stock Grant(a)
Annual
Incentive
Plans(b)
LTIP / Performance Shares(c)
Total
Stock
Awards
 
Michael J. Happe
2018
$
414,074

$

$
828,104

$
1,242,179

 
 
2017
370,937


633,354

1,004,291

 
 
2016
166,700

112,648

479,487

758,835

 
Bryan L. Hughes
2018
123,743


247,486

371,228

 
 
2017
280,500


171,386

451,886

 
Stacy L. Bogart (d)
2018
554,500


146,653

701,153

 
 
2017




 
Donald J. Clark
2018




 
 
2017




 
 
2016




 
Brian D. Hazelton
2018
121,789


243,578

365,368

 
 
2017
292,110


259,098

551,208

 
 
2016




(a)
These amounts represent non-performance based restricted stock granted pursuant to the 2014 Plan computed in accordance with ASC 718. The grant date fair value of each of the non-performance based awards was determined at the closing price of the Company's shares on the NYSE on the grant date without regard to estimated forfeitures related to service-based vesting conditions.
(b)
The amounts reported in this column do not reflect actual compensation realized by the NEOs in 2016. These amounts represent the fair value of the annual performance-based award, which was required to be paid in stock subject to a one-year holding period under the annual Officers Incentive Compensation Plan ("OICP") for 2016. The 2017 and 2018 OICPs have no stock component and are all cash.
(c)
The amounts shown represent the grant date fair value computed in accordance with FASB ASC 718 of the LTIP / performance share awards. The amounts shown for Fiscal 2018-2020 LTIP represent the values that are based on achievement of 100% of the target performance. Assuming achievement of the maximum 150% of target performance, the value of the Fiscal 2018-2020 LTIP awards would be: $1,242,156 for Mr. Happe; $371,229 for Mr. Hughes; $219,980 for Ms. Bogart; and $365,367 for Mr. Hazelton. Assumptions used in the calculation of the amounts reported in this column are included in Note 12 to the financial statements included in our 2018 Form 10-K.
(d)
Ms. Bogart joined the Company in January 2018.
(2)
The amounts shown represent the aggregate grant date fair values of the option grants. Assumptions used in the calculation of the amounts reported in this column are included in Note 12 to the financial statements included in our 2018 Form 10-K.
(3)
These amounts represent actual annual incentive plan award payouts made in cash to NEOs under the 2016, 2017 and 2018 OICPs. In the case of Mr. Clark, these amounts do not represent award payouts under such OICPs, but instead represent award payouts under the pre-existing Grand Design Management Incentive Plan that he participates in.
(4)
Amounts reported in this column for Fiscal 2018 include the following:
Name
Tax and Financial Planning
Car Allowance
Life Insurance Premiums
Dividend(1)
401(k) Match
Total
Michael J. Happe
$8,183
$18,400
$952
$9,277
$7,270
$44,082
Bryan L. Hughes
$8,183
$18,400
$952
$5,122
$4,789
$37,446
Stacy L. Bogart
$8,183
$7,846
$952
$3,000
$5,267
$25,248
Donald J. Clark
_
_
_
_
_
_
Brian D. Hazelton
$8,183
$18,400
$952
$4,031
$8,379
$39,945
(1) Beginning in Fiscal 2019, dividends accrue and do not vest until underlying awards vest.
(5)
Ms. Bogart received a new hire stock award of 10,000 shares of restricted stock on January 2, 2018 and a pro-rated FY18-20 LTIP award with a target value of 3,303 shares. She also received a sign-on bonus of $50,000 on January 2, 2018.


29

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

Grants of Plan-Based Awards Table

The following table provides additional information relating to plan-based awards granted to our NEOs in Fiscal 2018. Actual payouts were made to the NEOs under the 2014 Plan and the Fiscal 2018 OICP and awards were granted under the Fiscal 2018-2020 LTIP as discussed under "Compensation Discussion and Analysis-Annual Incentive Plan", "Fiscal 2018 OICP" and "2018 Equity Awards", respectively, above.
 
Plan Name
Grant
Date (3)
Estimated Future Payouts Under
Non-Equity Incentive Plan Awards(1)
Estimated Future Payments
Under Equity Incentive Plan Awards(2)
All Other
Stock Awards: Number of Shares of Stock or Units (#)
All Other Option Awards: Number of Securities Underlying Options (#)
Exercise or Base Price of Option Awards ($/Sh)
Grant Date Fair Value of Stock and Option Awards(4) 
($)
Name
Threshold
($)
Target
($)
Maximum
($)
Threshold
(#)
Target
(#)
Maximum
(#)
Michael J. Happe
2014 Plan
10/18/17
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
28,015

$44.40
$414,062
 
2014 Plan
10/18/17
 
 
 
 
 
 
9,326
 
 
$414,074
 
2018 OICP

108,000

675,000

1,350,000







 
 
 
 
 
FY18-20 LTIP
10/18/17
 
 
 
1,865

18,651

27,977

 
 
 
 
Bryan L. Hughes
2014 Plan
10/18/17
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8,373

$44.40
$123,753
 
2014 Plan
10/18/17
 
 
 
 
 
 
2,787
 
 
$123,743
 
2018 OICP
 
73,800

322,875

645,750

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
FY18-20 LTIP
10/18/17
 
 
 
557

5,574

8,361

 
 
 
Stacy L. Bogart
2014 Plan
-
 
 
 
 
 



-


 
 
2014 Plan
1/2/18
 
 
 
 
 
 
10,000
 
 
$554,500
 
2018 OICP

26,049

162,808

325,616





 
 
 
 
 
 
FY18-20 LTIP
1/2/18
 
 
 
330

3,303

4,954

 
 
 
 
Donald J. Clark(5)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Brian D. Hazelton
2014 Plan
10/18/17
 
 
 
 
 



8,241

$44.40
$121,802
 
2014 Plan
10/18/17
 
 
 
 
 
 
2,743
 
$121,789
 
2018 OICP

76,384

310,310

620,620



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
FY18-20 LTIP
10/18/17
 
 
 
548

5,486

8,229

 
 
 
 

(1)
Fiscal 2018 OICP targets annual performance against goals established by the Committee. Awards under the Fiscal 2018 OICP are payable in cash. The Threshold, Target and Maximum amounts presented above represent amounts that could have been earned by our NEOs for Fiscal 2018 under the Fiscal 2018 OICP. Ms. Bogart's Fiscal 2018 OICP has been prorated to reflect her January 2018 start date.
(2)
Fiscal 2018-2020 LTIP refers to our performance shares. For each of the NEOs, the Threshold, Target and Maximum amounts under the Fiscal 2018-2020 LTIP represent potential performance stock payments that are measured over a three-year performance period from August 30, 2017 through August 25, 2020.
(3)
The Human Resource Committee approved the Fiscal 2018 OICP and Fiscal 2018-2020 LTIP plans on October 18, 2017, effective as of August 27, 2017.
(4)
The grant date value per share of the restricted stock was $44.40 on October 18, 2017 and $55.40 on January 2, 2018, and for the stock option award, the Black-Scholes value per share was $14.78.
(5)
Mr. Clark is not eligible to participate in the Fiscal 2018 OICP or Fiscal 2018-2020 LTIP, however he remains eligible to participate in the pre-existing Grand Design Management Incentive Plan.

30

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

Narrative Disclosure to Summary Compensation Table and Grants of Plan-Based Awards Table
Executive Employment Arrangements

None of the current NEOs has an employment agreement except for Mr. Happe and Mr. Clark as previously discussed. However, all NEOs are party to an Executive Change of Control Agreement that provides the executive with three-year severance benefits in the event he or she ceased to be employed by the Company within three years of a “Change of Control,” as defined in the agreement. Discussion of the payouts provided for under various termination situations as well as the October 2018 revisions to these agreements is set forth in the section “Potential Payments upon Termination or Change of Control” below.
Base Salary

In general, the Committee annually reviews and adjusts base pay, in keeping with the overall objectives, pay philosophy and relative position with comparable companies, as discussed in more detail in the “Compensation Discussion and Analysis-Base Salary” above.
Stock Awards

Grants of restricted stock and stock options, the ASC 718 grant date fair value of which is disclosed in the Summary
 
Compensation Table, begin vesting annually in increments of one-third beginning one year from the date of grant for restricted stock grants. Restricted Stock grants and stock option awards are subject to earlier vesting in the event of a Change of Control or termination of employment, as set forth in the section “Potential Payments upon Termination or Change of Control” below.
Annual Incentive Plan

In addition to base salary, each NEO (other than Mr. Clark, who is eligible for a bonus as described on page 18 under "Elements of Compensation") is eligible to receive, subject to certain financial performance metrics, a target annual incentive cash award equal to a percentage of his or her annual base salary, which is discussed in the “Compensation Discussion and Analysis-Annual Incentive Plan” above.
Long-Term Incentive Plans

This element of compensation, including payouts made in Fiscal 2016, Fiscal 2017 and Fiscal 2018, is described in the “Compensation Discussion and Analysis - Fiscal 2018 Equity Awards" above. See “Compensation Discussion and Analysis” for further information regarding the terms of awards reported in the Summary Compensation Table and the Grants of Plan-Based Awards Table and for discussions regarding officer stock ownership guidelines, incentive compensation awards, and allocations between short-term and long-term compensation.

Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-End Table

The following table provides information regarding the outstanding equity awards held by each of the NEOs as of August 25, 2018:
 
Option Awards
Stock Awards
LTIP / Performance Shares
Name
Number of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercised
Options (#)
Exercisable
Number of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercised
Options (#)
Unexercisable
Option
Exercise
Price ($)
Option Expiration
Date
Number of Shares
or Units of Stock
That Have Not
Vested(3) (#)
Market Value of
Shares or Units
of Stock That
Have Not
Vested(4)(9) ($)
Equity Incentive Plan Awards: Number of Unearned Shares, Units or Other Rights That Have Not Yet Vested
Equity Incentive Plan Awards: Market or Payout Value of Unearned Shares, Units or Other Rights That Have Not Vested(10)
Michael J. Happe
4,433
8,867 (1)
$27.89
10/11/2026
21,527 (4)
$802,957
 
 
 
6,666
3,334 (2)
$16.67
1/18/2026
 
 
12,855(6)
$479,492
 
5,666
11,334 (3)
$35.50
12/13/2026
 
 
22,709 (7)
$847,046
 
-
28,015 (4)
$44.40
10/18/2027
 
 
18,651 (8)
$695,682
Bryan L. Hughes
-
8,737 (4)
$44.40
10/18/2027
9,454 (4)
$352,634
6,110 (7)
$227,903
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5,574 (8)
$207,910
Stacy L. Bogart
-
-
 
 
10,000 (4)
$373,000
3,303 (8)
$123,202
Donald J. Clark
-
-
$0.00
-
-
-
-
 
Brian D. Hazelton
2,333
4,667 (1)
$27.89
10/11/2026
-
-
9,290 (7)
$346,517
 
-
8,241 (4)
$44.40
10/18/2027
10,077 (4)
$375,872
5,486 (8)
$204,628

(1)
Represents stock granted on October 11, 2016 as an annual stock grant under the 2014 Plan, which will vest with respect to 33% of the shares covered by the option on each of the first three anniversaries of the grant date.
(2)
Represents stock granted on January 18, 2016 as a new hire grant under the 2014 Plan, which will vest with respect to 33% of the shares covered by the option on each of the first three anniversaries of the grant date.
(3)
Represents stock granted on December 13, 2016 as a grant for the purchase of Grand Design RV under the 2014 Plan, which will vest with respect to 33% of the shares covered by the option on each of the first three anniversaries of the grant date.

31

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

(4)
Represents stock granted on October 18, 2017 as an annual stock grant under the 2014 Plan, which will vest with respect to 33% of the shares covered by the option on each of the first three anniversaries of the grant date.
(5)
Represents stock granted on January 2, 2018 as a new hire grant under the Omnibus Plan, which will vest with respect to 1/3 of the shares on the first anniversary of the date of grant.
(6)
Represents FY16-18 LTIP at target, under the 2014 Plan for the three-year performance period beginning August 29 2015 ending August 25 2018. Settled shares subject to one year holding period.
(7)
Represents FY17-19 LTIP at target, under the 2014 Plan for the three-year performance period beginning August 28 2016 ending August 31 2019. Settled shares subject to one year holding period.
(8)
Represents FY18-20 LTIP at target, under the 2014 Plan for the three-year performance period beginning August 27 2017 ending August 30 2020. Settled shares subject to one year holding period.
(9)
Represents the value of unvested stock as of August 25th 2018 with a stock price of $37.30.
(10)
Represents the value of unearned LTIP awards at target as of August 25th 2018 with a stock price of $37.30.

Option Exercises and Stock Vested Table
The following table provides the amounts received before payroll withholding taxes upon the exercise of options or similar instruments or the vesting of stock or similar instruments during Fiscal 2018. 
 
Option Awards
 
Stock Awards
Name
Number of
Shares Acquired
on Exercise
(#)
 
Value Realized
on Exercise
($)
 
Number of
Shares Acquired
on Vesting
(#)
 
Value Realized
 on Vesting
($)(1)
Michael J. Happe
 
 
7,766

 
360,968

Bryan Hughes
 
 
3,333

 
120,821

Brian Hazelton
 
 
3,666

 
148,374

(1)
Valued at the closing market price of the Company's Common Stock of $36.05 (August 29, 2017), $43.00 (October 11, 2017), $52.40 (January 18, 2018) and $36.25 (May 15, 2018) as quoted on the NYSE on the vesting dates respectively.

Potential Payments upon Termination or Change of Control

Executive Change of Control Agreements

During Fiscal 2001, the Board of Directors approved Executive Change of Control Agreements for certain executive officers and, at later dates, approved agreements for certain other executive officers, including NEOs, not previously a party to an Executive Change of Control Agreement. In December 2008, the Board of Directors approved amendments to the Executive Change of Control Agreements primarily to comply with the enactment of IRC Section 409A, while still preserving material terms of the Company's agreement with each executive (the Executive Change of Control Agreements, as amended, “Agreements”).

The purpose of the Agreements is to reinforce and encourage executives to remain with the Company, to maintain objectivity and a high level of attention to their duties without distraction from the possibility of a change of control of the Company. The Agreements provide that in the event of a “Change of Control” of the Company, as that term is defined in the Agreements, each such executive (provided such Change of Control occurs when the executive is in the employ of the Company) would receive, in the event he or she ceases to be employed by the Company within three years following a Change of Control of the Company (for a reason other than death, disability, cause, normal retirement or, under certain circumstances, a voluntary termination of employment by the executive), a lump-sum equal to three times the average of the aggregate annual compensation paid to the executive during the three fiscal years preceding the Change of Control. The executives also receive annual and long-term incentive payments upon a Change in Control event if there is no termination of

 

employment upon Change in Control. This multiple was arrived at by the Committee after an analysis of certain
Compensation Peers' change of control agreements at the time these agreements were initially developed.

Under the Agreements, a “Change of Control” occurs when (i) any person becomes an “acquiring person” (as defined below) or (ii) individuals who shall qualify as Continuing Directors (as defined below) shall have ceased for any reason to constitute at least a majority of our Board of Directors; provided, however, that in the case of either clause (i) or (ii) a Change of Control shall not be deemed to have occurred if the event shall have been approved prior to the occurrence thereof by a majority of the Continuing Directors who shall then be members of such Board of Directors. “Continuing Director” means (i) any member of our Board of Directors, while such person is a member of the Board, who is not an affiliate or associate of any acquiring person or of any such acquiring person's affiliate or associate and was a member of the Board prior to the time when such acquiring person shall have become an acquiring person and (ii) any successor of a Continuing Director, while such successor is a member of the Board, who is not an acquiring person or any affiliate or associate of any acquiring person or a representative or nominee of an acquiring person or of any affiliate or associate of such acquiring person and is recommended or elected to succeed the Continuing Director by a majority of the Continuing Directors. An "acquiring person" means any person or any individual or group of affiliates or associates of such person who acquires beneficial ownership, directly or indirectly, of 20% or more of the outstanding stock of the Company if such acquisition occurs in whole or in part following the date of that person's agreement.



32

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

Annual Incentive Plan Payments

In the event of a “Change in Control” (as defined in the Officers Incentive Compensation Plan), participants are entitled to receive awards within 15 days of the effective date of the Change in Control based upon the Committee's estimate of our financial performance through the end of the fiscal year in which such Change in Control occurs and such payment is not dependent upon termination of employment. A participant must be employed by the Company at the end of the fiscal year to be eligible for annual incentive payments, except for a Change in Control as described above or as determined by the Committee for normal retirement, disability and death.

2014 Incentive Compensation Plan Payments

Long-Term Incentive Plan Payments

In the event of a “Change in Control” (as defined in the 2014 Plan) participants are entitled to receive awards within 15 days of the effective date of the Change in Control based on the Committee's estimate of our financial performance through the end of the applicable Long-Term Incentive Plan three-year fiscal period in which such Change in Control occurs. A participant must be employed by the Company at the end of the three-year fiscal period to be eligible for any long-term incentive award, except for a Change in Control as described above or as waived by the Committee.

Restricted Stock

Pursuant to restricted stock award agreements entered into by each NEO other than Mr. Clark, unvested awards of restricted stock will immediately vest to NEOs under the following circumstances:

if the NEO's termination of employment is due to his or her death or disability (as defined in the applicable Plan) and, in the case of the Fiscal 2016 and Fiscal 2017 restricted stock awards only, occurs after at least five consecutive years of employment with the Company, any unvested awards of restricted stock immediately vest

In addition, any restricted shares awarded prior to Fiscal 2019 that are not vested under the 2014 Plan will vest upon a “Change of Control” (as defined in the applicable Plan) of the Company. In all other circumstances, in the event that a NEO ceases to be employed by the Company or any subsidiary, any unvested awards held by such grantee will terminate and thereafter be null and void.

Stock Options

Pursuant to the stock option agreements entered into by certain of our NEOs, unvested options will vest upon a “Change of Control” (as defined in the 2014 Plan) of the
 
Company. In the event that a NEO ceases to be employed by the Company, stock options held by such NEO will vest as follows:

if the NEO's termination of employment is due to his or her disability and, in the case of the Fiscal 2016 and Fiscal 2017 option awards only, occurs after at least five consecutive years of employment with the Company, the stock options become vested in full and immediately exercisable for a period of ten years after any stock option grant date for non-qualified stock options; and
if the NEO's termination of employment is due to his or her death and, in the case of the Fiscal 2016 and Fiscal 2017 option awards only, occurs after at least five consecutive years of employment with the Company, the options shall become vested in full and immediately exercisable by the NEO's estate or legal representative following such termination of employment and shall thereafter, terminate.

In the event that a NEO ceases to be employed by the Company other than because of disability or death or, in the case of the Fiscal 2016, Fiscal 2017 and Fiscal 2018 option awards only, if any of disability or death occurs before the NEO has completed five consecutive years of employment with the Company, any outstanding stock options held by the NEO which have not vested as of the date of termination of employment will terminate.

Change in Control Definitions and Triggers

On October 15, 2018, the Committee approved new Executive Change in Control Agreements, which are expected to be entered into prior to December 31, 2018 with each of the NEOs (other than Mr. Clark), in order to align the Company's practices with market standard practices among our peers. The material changes to the new agreements include:

payment of severance only relative to salary and target annual incentives rather than total taxable earnings;
a revised severance multiple of two times rather than three times base salary and annual target bonus for all executives other than Mr. Happe, whose multiple remains at three times;
a reduced severance window linked to termination of employment without cause or for good reason within two years of the date of the change in control rather than three years; and
a revised definition of Change in Control that utilizes a 30% acquisition trigger rather than a 20% trigger.

Due to the unique nature of Mr. Clark's employment and compensation arrangements with the Company entered into in association with the Grand Design acquisition, no changes were made to Mr. Clark's Executive Change of Control Agreement.
Estimated Change of Control or Termination Payments and Benefits at the End of Fiscal 2018

The following table reflects the payments and benefits payable to each of the NEOs in the event of a termination of the executive's employment under several different circumstances. The amounts shown assume that termination was effective as of August 25, 2018, at the executive's compensation and service levels as of that date, and are estimates of the amounts that would be payable to the NEOs in each scenario. The amounts do not include benefits paid by insurance providers under life and disability policies or

33

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

payments and benefits provided on a non-discriminatory basis to employees upon a termination of employment. The actual amounts to be paid out can only be determined at the time of an executive's actual separation from the Company. Factors that could affect the nature and the amounts paid on termination of employment, among others, include the timing of event, compensation level, the market price of the Company's Common Stock and the executive's age.
Name
 
Severance(1)
 
Annual or Manage-ment Incentive Plan(2)
 
LTIP / Performance Shares(3)
 
Restricted Stock-Unvested and Accelerated(4)
 
Stock Options-Unvested and Accelerated(5)
 
Total Benefits
Michael J. Happe
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Retirement(6) or Voluntary Separation
 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$

Involuntary Termination for Cause
 

 

 

 

 

 

Change of Control:(7)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Without Termination
 

 

 
$1,940,966
 
$802,951
 
$172,620
 
$2,916,537
Termination WIthout Cause/Good Reason
 
$4,878,721
 
$855,658
 
$1,940,966
 
$802,951
 
$172,620
 
$8,650,916
Death
 

 
$855,658
 

 

 

 
$855,658
Disability
 

 
$855,658
 

 

 

 
$855,658
Bryan L. Hughes
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Retirement(6) or Voluntary Separation
 

 

 

 

 

 

Involuntary Termination for Cause
 

 

 

 

 

 

Change of Control:(7)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Without Termination
 

 

 
$417,894
 
$352,634
 

 
$770,528
Termination WIthout Cause/Good Reason
 
$2,125,196
 
$405,277
 
$417,894
 
$352,634
 

 
$3,301,001
Death
 

 
$405,277
 

 

 

 
$405,277
Disability
 

 
$405,277
 

 

 

 
$405,277
Stacy L. Bogart
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Retirement(6) or Voluntary Separation
 

 

 

 

 

 

Involuntary Termination for Cause
 

 

 

 

 

 

Change of Control:(7)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Without Termination
 

 

 
$146,653
 
$373,000
 

 
$519,653
Termination WIthout Cause/Good Reason
 
$1,597,497
 
$211,813
 
$146,653
 
$373,000
 

 
$2,328,963
Death
 

 
$211,813
 

 

 

 
$211,813
Disability
 

 
$211,813
 

 

 

 
$211,813
Donald J. Clark
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Retirement(6) or Voluntary Separation
 

 

 

 

 

 
$4,574,055
Involuntary Termination for Cause
 

 

 

 

 

 
$4,574,055
Change of Control:(7)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Without Termination
 

 

 

 

 

 

Termination WIthout Cause/Good Reason
 
$12,008,609
 

 

 

 

 
$12,008,609
Death
 

 
$4,574,055
 

 

 

 
$4,574,055
Disability
 

 
$4,574,055
 

 

 

 
$4,574,055
Brian D. Hazelton
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Retirement(6) or Voluntary Separation
 

 

 

 

 

 

Involuntary Termination for Cause
 

 
 
 

 

 

 

Change of Control:(7)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Without Termination
 

 

 
$502,676
 
$375,872
 
$43,916
 
$922,464
Termination WIthout Cause/Good Reason
 
$2,340,211
 
$173,054
 
$502,676
 
$375,872
 
$43,916
 
$3,435,729
Death
 

 
$173,054
 

 

 

 
$173,054
Disability
 

 
$173,054
 

 

 

 
$173,054
(1)
Severance upon a Change of Control equals an amount equal to three times the average of the aggregate annual compensation paid during our three fiscal years immediately preceding the Change of Control and excludes any payments required to cover IRC Section 280G obligations if applicable. Upon the execution of our revised Change in Control Agreements prior to December 31, 2018, severance equals an amount equal to two times (or three times in the case of our CEO) base salary and target annual incentive for executives party to these agreements.
(2)
Represents the NEOs' annual incentive eligibility pursuant to the 2018 Officers Incentive Compensation Plan (other than Mr. Clark) or 2018 Grand Design Management Incentive Plan (Mr. Clark).

34

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

(3)
Represents the LTIP incentive achieved pursuant to the Fiscal 2016-2018 LTIP, except by a termination pursuant to a Change of Control, which includes the full amount payable under the Fiscal 2016-2018 LTIP and the target amount estimated to be payable under the Fiscal 2017-2019 LTIP and the Fiscal 2018-2020 LTIP. Shares earned under these plans are subject to a one-year holding period post-vesting.
(4)
Represents the intrinsic value of stock grants based on our closing stock price of $37.30 per share on August 25, 2018, the last day of Fiscal 2018.
(5)
Represents the intrinsic value of stock options based on our closing stock price of $37.30 per share on August 25, 2018, the last day of Fiscal 2018.
(6)
Retirement under certain of the 2014 Plan award agreements is defined as attaining age 60 and five or more years of service with the Company.
(7)
The term "Change of Control" as used here is the term as defined in the 2014 Plan applicable to all awards granted prior to the Fiscal 2019 equity awards. Beginning with our Fiscal 2019 equity awards, under the 2019 Plan, the definition of Change in Control will be updated to include, among other things, a double trigger mechanism, as described further under "Change in Control Definitions and Triggers" on page 32.


CEO Pay Ratio Disclosure


As a result of rules adopted by the SEC under the Dodd-Frank Act, beginning for fiscal years starting January 1, 2017, the SEC requires disclosure of the ratio of the median employee’s annual total compensation to that of the principal executive officer (“PEO”). The Company’s PEO is Mr. Happe, our President and CEO.

As of our measurement date of August 25, 2018, our employee population including all full-time, part-time and temporary workers, consisted of approximately 5,965 individuals, all of whom worked in the United States.

To identify the median employee, as well as determine the annual total compensation of the median employee, we used the following methodology and consistently applied material assumptions, adjustments and estimates.
We compared the payroll data for our employee population described above (minus our PEO) using a compensation measure consisting of base pay related wages paid during Fiscal 2018. Base pay related wages includes the amount of base salary the employee received during the year and all other pay elements related to base pay including, but not limited to holiday pay, paid time off, overtime and shift differentials. We did not include cash bonuses, commissions, equity grants or any adjustments for the value of benefits provided.
We annualized the base pay related wages of all full-time and part-time employees who were hired by the Company and its subsidiaries between August 26, 2017 and August 25, 2018.
Based upon base pay related wages of each employee, we identified a median employee and calculated that employee’s annual total compensation.
We determined annual total compensation, including any perquisites and other benefits, in the same manner that we determine the annual total compensation of our PEO for purposes of the Summary Compensation Table disclosed below.

This resulted in the median employee’s annual total compensation as shown below.

Annual Total Compensation of Median Employee:    $33,925

Annual Total Compensation of PEO (Mr. Happe):    $3,213,673

Based on this information for Fiscal 2018, we reasonably estimate that the ratio of our CEO’s annual total compensation to the annual total compensation of our median employee was 95 to 1. Our pay ratio estimate has been calculated in a manner consistent with Item 402(u) of Regulation S-K.

The SEC’s rules for identifying the median compensated employee and calculating the pay ratio based on that employee’s annual total compensation allow companies to adopt a variety of methodologies, to apply certain exclusions, and to make reasonable estimates and assumptions that reflect their employee populations and compensation practices. As a result, the pay ratio reported by other companies may not be comparable to our pay ratio reported above.



35

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

Item 2: Approval of Executive Compensation (the "Say on Pay" Vote)
The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act requires the Board to provide our shareholders with the opportunity to vote, on a non-binding, advisory basis, on the compensation of our NEOs as set forth in this Proxy Statement in accordance with the compensation disclosure rules of the SEC. This proposal is also referred to as the "Say on Pay" vote. At the 2017 Annual Meeting, the shareholders determined that the Say on Pay vote would be held annually.

As described in the “Compensation Discussion and Analysis” section of this Proxy Statement, the primary objectives of our executive compensation programs are to attract and retain key executives critical to us; to align the interests of our Management with those of our shareholders; to integrate compensation with our business plans; and to reward for both business and individual performance, whereby a substantial portion of each executive officer's total compensation potential is a function of performance incentives. The Board believes the compensation of the NEOs outlined in the Proxy Statement is appropriate based upon the performance of the Company.

While the Board of Directors and especially the Human Resources Committee intend to carefully consider the results of the voting on this proposal when making future decisions regarding executive compensation, the vote is not binding on the Company or the Board and is advisory in nature.

YOUR BOARD OF DIRECTORS UNANIMOUSLY RECOMMENDS VOTING, ON A NON-BINDING, ADVISORY BASIS, FOR APPROVAL OF THE EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION AS OUTLINED IN THE PROXY STATEMENT FOR THE REASONS DISCUSSED ABOVE.


















 
Item 3: Approval of the 2019 Omnibus Incentive Plan


Introduction

On October 16, 2018, our Board of Directors, at the recommendation of our Human Resources Committee (the “Committee”), approved the Winnebago Industries, Inc. 2019 Omnibus Incentive Plan (the “2019 Plan”), subject to approval by our shareholders at the 2018 Annual Meeting. The 2019 Plan will become effective on the date it is approved by our shareholders, and will replace the 2014 Omnibus Equity, Performance Award and Incentive Compensation Plan (the “2014 Plan”). We do not grant any equity awards under any plan other than the 2014 Plan and our Directors’ Deferred Compensation Plan (the "Directors' Plan").
 
After the 2019 Plan becomes effective upon approval by our shareholders, no new awards will be made under the 2014 Plan.  The number of shares of our Common Stock that may be the subject of awards and issued under the 2019 Plan is 4,100,000, plus the shares subject to any awards outstanding under the 2014 Plan and our predecessor plan, the 2004 Incentive Compensation Plan (the “2004 Plan”), as of the date the 2019 Plan becomes effective that subsequently expire, are forfeited or canceled or are settled for cash. Until such time, however, awards under the 2014 Plan and the 2004 Plan, respectively, that are outstanding on the date the 2019 Plan becomes effective will continue to be subject to the terms of the 2014 Plan or 2004 Plan, as applicable.
 
As of August 25, 2018, a total of 469,704 shares were subject to outstanding awards under the 2014 Plan, and 9,000 shares were subject to outstanding awards under the 2004 Plan. As of the same date, 1,677,481 shares in the aggregate were available for future awards under the 2014 Plan. Any shares remaining available for future awards under the 2014 Plan as of the effective date of the 2019 Plan will not be carried over into the 2019 Plan.
 
Shareholder Approval and Board of Directors Recommendation

Shareholder approval of the 2019 Plan is being sought in order to satisfy the shareholder approval requirements of the NYSE and Internal Revenue Code (as amended, the “Code”) Section 422 to enable options granted under the 2019 Plan to qualify as incentive stock options.
 
Our Board of Directors recommends that our shareholders vote FOR the 2019 Plan because it includes a number of features that we believe are consistent with the interests of our shareholders and sound corporate governance practices. The 2019 Plan also will provide us with a share reserve that will enable us to continue to provide a competitive mix of compensation to our key employees.  If the 2019 Plan is not approved by our shareholders, the 2014 Plan will remain in effect and we will remain subject to its existing share reserve.

 

36

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

Factors Considered in Setting Size of Requested Share Reserve

As of August 25, 2018, there were 31,824,951 shares of our Common Stock issued and outstanding. The closing sale price of a share of our Common Stock on the NYSE on that date was $37.30.
In setting the proposed number of shares reserved and issuable under the 2019 Plan, the Committee and our Board of Directors considered a number of factors as described below.
Awards Outstanding and Shares Available for Grant

The table below shows, as of August 25, 2018, the shares reserved for issuance of outstanding awards under the 2014 Plan as well as its predecessor, our 2004 Plan, and available for future grant under our 2014 Plan. The table also shows the number of shares that will be available for future grants under each equity compensation plan following approval of the 2019 Plan by our shareholders.

 
As of August 25, 2018(1)
After Approval of 2019 Plan
 
Shares Reserved for Issuance of Outstanding Awards(1)
Shares Available for Future Awards
Shares Reserved for Issuance of Outstanding Awards
Shares Available for Future Awards
2004 Plan(2)
9,000

0
6,500

0
2014 Plan(2)
469,704

1,677,481

353,347

0
2019 Plan
0
0
0
4,100,000(3)
Total
478,704

1,677,481

359,847

4,100,000(3)
(1) Shares reserved for issuance of outstanding awards at August 25, 2018 consist of the following:
 
Types of Awards
 
 
Options/SARs
Full Value Awards
Weighted Average Exercise Price of Options/SARs
Shares Available for Future Awards
2004 Plan(2)
0

0
N/A
0
2014 Plan(2)
138,510

331,194

36.68
0
(1) We also issue stock units pursuant to our Directors’ Plan using treasury shares. The Directors’ Plan does not limit the number of shares of Common Stock issuable thereunder. The number of stock units to be distributed pursuant to the Directors’ Plan upon a directors' separation from service of the Company will be based upon the amount of the participating directors’ compensation and the per share price at the time of deferral.
(2) No further equity awards may be granted under the 2004 Plan or, following shareholder approval of the 2019 Plan, under the 2014 Plan; however, any shares that would return to the 2004 Plan or 2014 Plan as a result of an award terminating, expiring or being forfeited or being settled in cash in lieu of shares will instead become available under the 2019 Plan.
(3) The 2019 Plan authorizes 4,100,000 shares for awards.
Historical Equity Granting Practices 

Our three-year average “burn rate” was 0.8% for Fiscal 2016 through Fiscal 2018.  We define burn rate as the total number of shares subject to awards granted to participants in a single year expressed as a percent of our basic weighted average common shares outstanding for that year.  We believe our historical burn rate is reasonable for a company of our size in our industry.

Estimated Duration of Shares Available for Issuance under the 2019 Plan 

Based on the 4,100,000 shares to be reserved under the 2019 Plan and our three-year average burn rate as described above, we expect that the requested share reserve will cover awards for approximately 8 years.

Expected Dilution

As of August 25, 2018, our existing voting power dilution under the 2014 Plan was 6.6%.  We define existing voting power dilution as the sum of (i) the total number of shares available for future grants under the 2014 Plan and (ii) the total number of shares of our Common Stock subject to outstanding awards under the 2014 Plan and the 2004 Plan, divided by the fully diluted number of common shares outstanding. Our projected voting power dilution as of that same date would be 14.2%, based on including the 4,100,000 share reserve under the 2019 Plan in the formula, and eliminating the shares available for future grants under the 2014 Plan, since unused shares under the 2014 Plan will not be carried over to the 2014 Plan. In light of the expected duration of 2019 Plan’s share reserve, we believe that the expected dilution that will result from the 2019 Plan is reasonable for a company of our size in our industry.


37

 
winnebagoindlogora09.jpg

Key Compensation Practices

The content of the 2019 Plan is similar to our 2014 Plan. The primary changes reflected in the 2019 Plan, as compared to the 2014 Plan include:

Updated definition of “Change in Control”. The 2019 Plan definition increases the level of stock ownership required to trigger a change in control to 30%, up from 20% in the 2014 Plan and better reflects current market practices.

“Double trigger” acceleration of equity awards upon a Change in Control. The 2019 Plan provides for ve